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I'm reading << real world haskell >> Chapter 8 and wanted to see how the SumFile.hs program handles say, 1 million numbers:

main :: IO ()
main = do
  contents <- getContents
  print (sumFile contents)
    where sumFile = sum . map read . words

When I feed 1 million integers to the program with:

runhaskell SumFile.hs < data.txt, the program gives a correct result.

However, when I compiled it using GHC:

ghc SumFile.hs

The binary gives a "Stack space overflow" error:

./SumFile < data.txt 
Stack space overflow: current size 8388608 bytes.
Use `+RTS -Ksize -RTS' to increase it.

I have two questions:

  1. What is causing the stack space usage?
  2. Why does the compiled version differ from the interpreted version and what can I do?

Thanks!

EDIT:

Alright the reason is map, but here's a modified version that uses lazy bytestring:

import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy as L
import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8 as LCHAR
import Data.Monoid
import Data.List

main :: IO ()
main = do
  contents <- L.getContents
  case sumFile contents of
    Nothing -> print "Invalid input"
    Just s -> print $ getSum s
   where sumFile = foldl' mappend (Just (Sum 0)) . map ((fmap Sum) . (fmap fst) . LCHAR.readInt) . (LCHAR.words)

The result is the same: binary version uses up stack space even though I'm not using sum.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First, simple clarification: the stack in ghc runtime has nothing to deal with stack segment, it is internal structure of runtime and this is not source of buffer-overflow type attacks.

Second. Haskell is lazy. Lazy io (getContents) produce lazy list. sum produce result lazily. However, once the result of sum is requested, it has to dig into list recursively, quickly exhausting stack space (you can look in the sources if wish)

to avoid it, you have to use strict version of sum, it should eliminate problem. Standard library has a special function for such cases, foldl' - a strict version of foldl. using foldl' (+) 0 in place of sum should eliminate problem

Third. Stack space leaks are very common problem when one use lazy IO. It may be solved if one switch to iteratee-based IO. Otherwise one should learn to add strictness annotation where needed.

Ah. And by the way. GHC is optimizing compiler. It is not common, but still possible to have some problems with memory leakage in compiled program and to not have them with ghci and vice versa.

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I had a discussion with folks on #haskell, the reason that the ByteString version gives stack overflow error is due to the nested Just (Sum Num) where the inner part is not strictly evaluated.

Essentially when we mappend two Maybe (Just Num), say, Just (Sum 2) and Just (Sum 3), foldl' uses seq to produce a Just ((Sum 2) mappend (Sum 3)), ie. seq strictly evaluated the outmost constructor (mappend two Just (Monoid) to produce a Just (Monoid)). In this case, the inner Monoid is not strictly evaluated, so they are left as mappend connected (Sum Num). This results in 1 million mappend connected (Sum Num) wrapped in Just.

So Saizan on #haskell gives this version which strictly evaluates the inner part of Maybe (Sum Num)

import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy as L
import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy.Char8 as LCHAR
import Data.Monoid
import Data.List

forceMaybe Nothing = Nothing
forceMaybe (Just x) = x `seq` (Just x)

main :: IO ()
main = do
  contents <- L.getContents
  case sumFile contents of
    Nothing -> print "Invalid input"
    Just s -> print $ getSum s
   where sumFile = foldl' (\ x y -> forceMaybe (x `mappend` y)) (Just (Sum 0)) . map ((fmap Sum) . (fmap fst) . LCHAR.readInt) . (LCHAR.words)
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I checked out the online version of the book, there're some discussion under that program and the reason it uses stack space is due to map, replacing map with foldl' solves the problem.

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