Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In JLS, §17.4.5. Happens-before Order, it says that

A program is correctly synchronized if and only if all sequentially consistent executions are free of data races.

It only give us definition about "sequentially consistent", it does not give us definition about "sequentially consistent executions". Only after knowing about what is "sequentially consistent executions", we may make further discussion about the topic.

So what's "sequentially consistent executions" and what's "sequentially consistent executions are free of data races"?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

An execution has a very simple formal definition: it is simply a total ordering on the set of all memory actions that is under consideration.

A sequentially consistent execution is represented by any total ordering on actions which is sequentially consistent.

The term "free of data races" is also precisely defined by the JLS.

Note that the JLS does not require sequential consistency. In fact, the whole formalism of happens-before exists in order to define precisely the terms under which sequentially inconsistent executions can maintain an illusion of sequential consistency.

share|improve this answer
    
Would you please give me an example about sequentially consistent executions in which it contains data race? Thanks a lot. – newman Aug 18 '12 at 14:29
    
This is very simple: global int i is written by thread t1, then read by t2. t2 reads the value written by t1 so the execution is sequentially consistent. However, there is no happens-before ordering between these actions so there's a data race. Note that happens-before doesn't come about automatically, just because there's a time ordering of these events. – Marko Topolnik Aug 18 '12 at 14:34
    
Thanks for your reply. one step further, could you please give me such an example: all sequentially consistent executions of a program is data race free, but the normal execution of such program contains data race. Thanks a lot. – newman Aug 18 '12 at 15:02
    
I have to go, see you next day. – newman Aug 18 '12 at 15:11
    
There is no such an example, which is precisely the point of it all: a properly synchronized program can be sequentially inconsistent without introducing a data race. That's the basis for all compiler optimizations. – Marko Topolnik Aug 18 '12 at 16:27

sequentially consistent executions means basically that each read operation on a variable sees the last write operation on that variable, no matter on which thread or processor the read/write operations are performed.

However, the JLS does not guarantee sequential consistency out of the box. Programmers have to achieve this consistency by proper synchronisation. Without synchronisation, threads may see inappropriate data, e.g. data that is being modified by another thread at the same time. This is called "data race".

share|improve this answer
    
I'm confused about your answer, so may I modify your definition as follows: sequentially consistent executions means basically ... on that variable in program order. If I'm not right, please point out. – newman Aug 18 '12 at 12:28
    
sequentially consistent executions means basically that each read operation on a variable sees the last write operation on that variable in a total execution order which is consistent with program order. Am I right? – newman Aug 18 '12 at 12:33
    
Yes, that's basically the definition of §17.4.3 – Stefan Ferstl Aug 18 '12 at 12:42
    
Because there is a total order for all operations, operations in same thread obey program order, operations in different thread obey total order. I heard from someone said that sequentially consistent executions is just execution in a single CPU computer. I'm not sure whether it is true or not. So what's your opinion? – newman Aug 18 '12 at 12:44
    
This is not true. Even with a single CPU there's multithreading and a possibility of data races. – Marko Topolnik Aug 18 '12 at 12:45

To ensure that two actions are free of a data race, you must establish a happens-before relationship between the two actions using any of the five conditions specified in §17.4.5 and recapitulated in Memory Consistency Properties. Once you do that, your program is correctly synchronized with respect to those two actions. All executions of that program will appear to be sequentially consistent, and you can safely ignore any re-ordering permitted in §17.4.3. Programs and Program Order.

share|improve this answer
    
would you please give me an example about sequentially consistent executions in which it contains data race? Thanks a lot. – newman Aug 18 '12 at 13:42
    
    
I have to go, see you next day. – newman Aug 18 '12 at 15:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.