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I created a matrix class with templates:

template <typename T>
class Matrix
{
    static_assert(std::is_arithmetic<T>::value,"");

public:
    Matrix(size_t n_rows, size_t n_cols);
    Matrix(size_t n_rows, size_t n_cols, const T& value);

    // Functions

    // Operators
Matrix<T>& operator*=(const T& value)

private:
    size_t rows;
    size_t cols;
    std::vector<T> data;
};

I created the following two (external) operators to multiply my matrix with a number:

// Inner operator used by the externals ones
template <typename T>
inline Matrix<T>& Matrix<T>::operator*=(const T& value)
{
    for(size_t i(0); i < data.size(); i++)
    {
        data[i] *= value;
    }

    return *this;
}

template <typename T>
inline Matrix<T> operator*(const T& value, const Matrix<T>& matrix)
{
    Matrix<T> tmp(matrix);

    return tmp *= value;
}

template <typename T>
inline Matrix<T> operator*(const Matrix<T>& matrix, const T& value)
{
    return value * matrix;
}

The problem is that if I declared the matrix as a double, I can multiply the matrix only by doubles and so on...

Matrix<double> m1(3,3,1.);

5. * m1; // Works
5 * m1; // Doesn't work (5 is an int and not a double)

How can I fix this behave? It is possible to let doubles be multiplied by others arithmetic types?

share|improve this question
    
I removed the "casting" tag. Conversion is when a value of one type is changed to a different type. Casting is when you tell the compiler to do a conversion. Here you're looking for an implicit conversion, which is not a cast. –  aschepler Aug 18 '12 at 12:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Sure, just allow two parameters to your templated free functions and member functions.

For example:

template <typename T> class Matrix {
  /* ... */
  template <typename U>
  inline Matrix<T>& operator*=(const U& value)
  {
    for(size_t i(0); i < data.size(); i++)
    {
        data[i] *= value;
    }

    return *this;
  }
};

template <typename T, typename U>
inline Matrix<T> operator*(const U& value, const Matrix<T>& matrix)
{
    Matrix<T> tmp(matrix);

    return tmp *= value;
}

This will trigger compiletime errors if you try to multiply your Matrix with something nonsensical, that is, if T*U is undefined.

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect. Thank you! –  user1434698 Aug 18 '12 at 12:34
    
The member function doesn't need this change to help template argument deduction. But there might be other reasons to do it anyway. –  aschepler Aug 18 '12 at 12:54
    
@aschepler: What change? The only change I'm aware of introducing is templating the type of the parameter, and you need this, to allow it to accept arbitrary types. Are you suggesting to check whether T*U is allowed using SFINAE? –  bitmask Aug 18 '12 at 13:02
    
I only meant that the original code does allow m1 *= 5;, using the implicit conversion from int to double. –  aschepler Aug 18 '12 at 22:34

Yes. Declare the function in the Matrix class as

template <typename T> 
class Matrix 
{
public:
    /* ... */
    template <typename S> 
    inline Matrix & operator*=( const S & value );
    /* ... */
};

The definition looks like

template <typename T>
template <typename S>
inline Matrix<T>& Matrix<T>::operator*=(const S& value)
{
    for(size_t i(0); i < data.size(); i++)
    {
        data[i] *= value;
    }

    return *this;
}

for the member function. You need to write template twice. A bit odd, but that's C++ syntax.

In case of the free functions you can write

template <typename T, typename S>
inline Matrix<T> operator*(const S& value, const Matrix<T> &mat)
{
    Matrix<T> tmp(mat);

    return tmp *= value;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect. Thank you! –  user1434698 Aug 18 '12 at 12:34
    
Why I have to split the template definition if it is a member function while I can use a single template definition with two parameters if it is a non-member function? –  user1434698 Aug 18 '12 at 13:42
1  
That's one of the odd syntax rules of C++. I guess this is introduced, because you write template twice in the declaration too. Once for the class (T) and once for the function parameters themselves (S). –  Ralph Tandetzky Aug 24 '12 at 9:30

The problem that you are seeing is that template type deduction requires a perfect match of all of the deduced types. In your case you have a template that takes a single type argument T that is both the scalar and the matrix types. When the compilers sees the operation: 5 * m1, it deduces T == int for the first argument but T == double for the second argument, and type deduction fails.

There are multiple approaches around this, as it has been suggested, you can add a second template argument:

template <typename T, typename S>
Matrix<T> operator*( Matrix<T> m, S scalar ) {
   return m*=scalar;
}

[Note: both arguments by value, the second one because for arithmetic types it is more efficient and idiomatic to pass by value; the first one because by moving the copy to the interface of the function you allow the compiler to elide copies]. This approach is simple, but will generate one operator* for each combination of S and T in the program, even though the actual multiplication in operator*= is always performed on T.

Another approach would be to fix the type of the scalar that you want to multiply by, for example, make it double, generating only one operator* per T type that is multiplied:

template <typename T>
Matrix<T> operator*( Matrix<T> m, double scalar ) {
   return m*=scalar;
}

In this approach there is a single operator*, the one taking a double as argument. As in the previous example, it might require two type conversions on the scalar (say you multiply Matrix<int> by 5, it will then convert 5 into a double, which will then be converted back to int to match the signature of operator*=.

The third approach is to create a non-templated function that takes your Matrix and another argument of the same type. This will be the closest to your original code, with the slight advantage that not being a template, it will allow conversions for the scalar argument. Theoretically you could define all such functions yourself manually:

Matrix<int>    operator*( Matrix<int>,    int ) { ... }
Matrix<double> operator*( Matrix<double>, double ) { ... }

But this becomes a maintenance problem very easily. Luckily, there is a feature in the language that allows for the definition of all those non-template functions generically. Although the syntax might not be the most natural. You just need to declare the free function as a friend of your template, and define it inside the class template definition:

template <typename T>
class Matrix {
// ...
   friend Matrix operator*( Matrix m, T scalar ) { return m*=scalar; }
};

As we are inside the class template Matrix, we can use Matrix (without arguments) to refer to the current instantiation (Matrix<int>, Matrix<double...) [This might not seem obviously important, but it is, it is important to realize when Matrix refers to the template, and when it refers to the class generated from the template]. The second argument to the function is T. Again, this is not the generic T of the class template, but the current instantiating type (int, double...).

The language allows for the definition of a friend function inside the class that has the declaration, and that will define the function at namespace level, although the declaration will only be found through Argument Dependent Lookup.

Whenever you instantiate a particular instance of your template (say Matrix<int>) and call the operator, the compiler will generate the free function for you. Because the function is not templated, it will allow conversions on the arguments, and thus for Matrix<int> m it will allow you to call m * 5. by converting 5. into an int.

share|improve this answer
    
This approach is simple, but will generate one operator* for each combination of S and T in the program, even though the actual multiplication in operator*= is always performed on T. This is a problem? The generation of each combination of S and T will slow only the compilation or is also a problem in runtime? –  user1434698 Aug 19 '12 at 8:38
    
@R.M.: It is not necessarily bad, and in this particular case, where the actual function is just a forwarder it should not affect much, but say that you implemented operator* directly (no forwarding), then for each combination of S and T the compiler will have to generate the function, which means that there would be one implementation in the binary for each combination, and the binary would be larger. I am tempted to say that a larger binary has higher chances for cache-misses in the instruction cache, but note that this would not be noticeable in most cases. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 19 '12 at 12:13

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