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#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

char tracks[][80] = {
"I left my heart in Harvard Med School",
"Newark, Newark - a wonderful town",
"Dancing with a Dork",
"From here to maternity",
"The girl from Iwo Jima",
};

void find_track(char search_for[])
{
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        if (strstr(tracks[i], search_for))
        printf("Track %i: '%s'\n", i, tracks[i]);
    }

}
int main()
{
    char search_for[80];
    printf("Search for: ");
    fgets(search_for, 80, stdin);
    find_track(search_for);
    getch();
    return 0;

}

This is the code taken directly from Head First C. This doesn't work.On the other hand if I change the line in main

char search_for[80];

to

char *search_for = "town"

It gives me the expected result. I don't understand why it doesn't work.I understand that directly pasting the code and telling you to find errors is not very much acceptable here but i guess it is a very small piece of basic code so it will do.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
I had exactly the same problem just now, and for those who don't know, there is an errata page, although it doesn't give much explanations (but at least you can spot the errors) oreilly.com/catalog/errata.csp?isbn=0636920015482 –  ling Aug 27 '14 at 17:23
    
One possible solution: goo.gl/4hfPze –  Koray Tugay Mar 17 at 10:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem with the code above is that it doesn't account for the fact that fgets leaves the newline in the string. So when you type town and hit enter, you'll end up searching for "town\n".

A cheap way to solve this would be to fix the string after calling fgets

search_for[strlen(search_for) - 1] = 0;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your quick response! So what should i use instead? –  IDK Aug 18 '12 at 15:08
    
Yes, that seems to work ! So i do it whenever i'm using fgets.Is there any other way? –  IDK Aug 18 '12 at 15:16
    
@Aashima You could look up "string" trimming. You could read strings differently, for example scanf("%79[^n]\n", search_for). –  cnicutar Aug 18 '12 at 15:18
    
Looks like some regex but i don't quite get it. Scanf doesn't have a problem with '\n' , right? It has a problem with spaces –  IDK Aug 18 '12 at 15:23
    
@Aashima Listen, I can't act like your instructor :-) You really need to study on your own. –  cnicutar Aug 18 '12 at 15:23

As already pointed out by @cnicutar, fgets leaves the newline char (code 10) in the string. You can find this out by yourself by iterating over the char array and printing the character codes and looking the special chars up in an ASCII code table (http://www.asciitable.com/):

int main()
{
    int i;
    char search_for[80];
    printf("Search for: ");
    fgets(search_for, 80, stdin);
    scanf("%79s", search_for);

    // print index, char code, char itself
    for (i=0;i<80;i++) {
        printf("%d: %d %c\n", i, search_for[i], search_for[i]);
    }
    find_track(search_for);
    getch();

    return 0;
}

The output will be:

...
0: 116 t
1: 111 o
2: 119 w
3: 110 n
4: 10
5: 0 
...

You can use the function "scanf" and limit the number of read chars to 79 (1 char reserve for NULL char at the end of the string as the buffer holds max 80 chars). See: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/scanf/ for reference.

int main()
{
    char search_for[80];

    printf("Search for: ");
    scanf("%79s", search_for);

    find_track(search_for);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detailed explanation.Yes! Did that :-) –  IDK Aug 18 '12 at 15:29

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