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Basically my mate has been saying that I could make my code shorter by using a different way of checking if an int array contains an int, although he won't tell me what it is :P.

Current:

    public boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key) {
        for (final int i : array) {
            if (i == key) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }

Have also tried this, although it always returns false for some reason.

    public boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key) {
        return Arrays.asList(array).contains(key);
    }

Could anyone help me out?

Thank you.

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7  
Your Arrays.asList(...) call takes a vararg, that is it will wrap the arbitrary number of arguments you might pass into that in a List. In your case, you're getting a list of arrays with a single element, and this list obviously does not contain the int. –  sarcan Aug 18 '12 at 16:45
    
gist.github.com/b4f85c52f393c62bd4cc –  Caleb Aug 18 '12 at 16:47
    
Your comment meaning what now? –  sarcan Aug 18 '12 at 16:49
    
check Hashset based retrial mechanism answer. It is the fastest way. –  Amit Deshpande Aug 18 '12 at 17:22
    
I don't see any point at making your original code shorter since your argument is a primitive array and your code is very clear and straightfoward. ArrayList implementation is doing the same. –  Genzer Aug 18 '12 at 17:38

13 Answers 13

It's because Arrays.asList(array) return List<int[]>. array argument is treated as one value you want to wrap (you get list of arrays of ints), not as vararg.

Note that it does work with object types (not primitives):

public boolean contains(final String[] array, final String key) {
    return Arrays.asList(array).contains(key);
}

or even:

public <T>  boolean contains(final T[] array, final T key) {
    return Arrays.asList(array).contains(key);
}

But you cannot have List<int> and autoboxing is not working here.

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A different way:

public boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key) {  
     Arrays.sort(array);  
     return Arrays.binarySearch(array, key) != -1;  
}  

This modifies the passed-in array. You would have the option to copy the array and work on the original array i.e. int[] sorted = array.clone();
But this is just an example of short code. The runtime is O(NlogN) while your way is O(N)

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11  
I think I'd be surprised if a contains method modified my array. –  Zong Zheng Li Aug 18 '12 at 16:56
    
@ZongLi:This is just an example for the OP.Updated OP if we are nitpicking –  Cratylus Aug 18 '12 at 17:01
4  
From javadoc of binarySearch(): "the return value will be >= 0 if and only if the key is found." so Arrays.binarySearch(array,key)>=0 should be returned! –  icza Apr 24 at 12:25
    
Supplement: The return value of binarySearch() is (-(insertion point) - 1) if key is not contained which may likely be a value other than -1. –  icza Apr 24 at 12:32
    
This can't be -1 if it is intending to be true. "The insertion point is defined as the point at which the key would be inserted into the list: the index of the first element greater than the key, or list.size() if all elements in the list are less than the specified key.". Need to say >= 0. –  staticx Apr 25 at 13:14

Arrays.asList returns List<int[]>, so you could create an array of Integer[]:

public boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key) {     
    return Arrays.asList(ArrayUtils.toObject(array)).contains(key);
}

This uses Apache Commons ArrayUtils for object wrapper creation.

share|improve this answer

Try Integer.parseInt() to do this.....

public boolean chkInt(final int[] array){
    int key = false;

    for (Integer i : array){


          try{

                   Integer.parseInt(i);
                   key = true;
                   return key;

             }catch(NumberFormatException ex){

                   key = false;

                   return key;

              }


     }
}
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Depending on how large your array of int will be, you will get much better performance if you use collections and .contains rather than iterating over the array one element at a time:

import static org.junit.Assert.assertTrue;
import java.util.HashSet;

import org.junit.Before;
import org.junit.Test;

public class IntLookupTest {

int numberOfInts = 500000;
int toFind = 200000;
int[] array;

HashSet<Integer> intSet;

@Before
public void initializeArrayAndSet() {
    array = new int[numberOfInts];
    intSet = new HashSet<Integer>();
    for(int i = 0; i < numberOfInts; i++) {
        array[i] = i;
        intSet.add(i);
    }
}

@Test
public void lookupUsingCollections() {
    assertTrue(intSet.contains(toFind));
}

@Test
public void iterateArray() {
    assertTrue(contains(array, toFind));

}

public boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key) {
    for (final int i : array) {
        if (i == key) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
}
share|improve this answer

Fastest way to retrieve any integer from array is using Hashset.

HashSet<Integer> set= new HashSet<Integer>(Arrays.asList(intArray));
set.contains(intValue)

Set retrial mechanism is fastest because of Hashcode mechanism and has complexity of O(1)

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1  
Actually, a HashSet would have a complexity of O(1), O(log(n)) would be for a binary search, e.g. in a TreeSet or a sorted array. However, contructing the HashSet is way, way too expensive for a simple contains method. –  sarcan Aug 18 '12 at 17:33
    
Corrected Thanks. –  Amit Deshpande Aug 18 '12 at 17:35
    
Unfortunately Arrays.asList(intArray) doesn't work as you would like it to, so this solution doesn't even compile! –  icza Apr 24 at 13:40

Guava offers additional methods for primitive types. Among them a contains method which takes the same arguments as yours.

public boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key) {
    return Ints.contains(array, key);
}

You might as well statically import the guava version.

See Guava Primitives Explained

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Solution #1

Since the original question only wants a simplified solution (and not a faster one), here is a one-line solution:

public boolean contains(int[] array, int key) {
    return Arrays.toString(array).matches(".*[\\[ ]" + key + "[\\],].*");
}

Explanation: Javadoc of Arrays.toString() states the result is enclosed in square brackets and adjacent elements are separated by the characters ", " (a comma followed by a space). So we can count on this. First we convert array to a string, and then we check if key is contained in this string. Of course we cannot accept "sub-numbers" (e.g. "1234" contains "23"), so we have to look for patterns where the key is preceded with an opening bracket or a space, and followed by a closing bracket or a comma.

Note: The used regexp pattern also handles negative numbers properly (whose string representation starts with a minus sign).

Solution #2

This solution is already posted but it contains mistakes, so I post the correct solution:

public boolean contains(int[] array, int key) {
    Arrays.sort(array);
    return Arrays.binarySearch(array, key) >= 0;
}

Also this solution has a side effect: it modifies the array (sorts it).

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1.one-off uses

List<T> list=Arrays.asList(...)
list.contains(...)

2.use HashSet for performance consideration if you use more than once.

Set <T>set =new HashSet<T>(Arrays.asList(...));
set.contains(...)
share|improve this answer

What about efficiency your code is good enough. But if you want to make it shorter you can do something like this:

    public boolean contains(final int[] array, final int key) {
        return Arrays.toString(array).matches("(.*[^0-9])?" + key + "([^0-9].*)?");
}

Still I won't be happy if I'll find a code like this one in my project.

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I know this is a really old question with plenty of answers, but most of them are plain... odd...

First of all, you wouldn't really need a contains method as it can be as short as this:

public boolean contains(final int key, final int... array) {
    Arrays.sort(array);
    return Arrays.binarySearch(array, keys) >= 0;
}

It is often more feasible to sort the array once (instead of every time) right after you create the array. Of course, with dynamic content this won't work, but with an array that's re-used several times you only want to sort once.

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try: Arrays.asList(int[] array).contains(int key);

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I know it's super late, but try Integer[] instead of int[].

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