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In cases where I have a key for each element and I don't know the index of the element into an array, hashtables perform better than arrays (O(1) vs O(n)).

Why is that? I mean: I have a key, I hash it.. I have the hash.. shouldn't the algorithm compare this hash against every element's hash? I think there's some trick behind the memory disposition, isn't it?

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In cases where I have a key for each element and I don't know the index of the element into an array, hashtables perform better than arrays (O(1) vs O(n)).

The hash table search performs O(1) in the average case. In the worst case, the hash table search performs O(n): when you have collisions and the hash function always returns the same slot. One may think "this is a remote situation," but a good analysis should consider it. In this case you should iterate through all the elements like in an array or linked lists (O(n)).

Why is that? I mean: I have a key, I hash it.. I have the hash.. shouldn't the algorithm compare this hash against every element's hash? I think there's some trick behind the memory disposition, isn't it?

You have a key, You hash it.. you have the hash: the index of the hash table where the element is present (if it has been located before). At this point you can access the hash table record in O(1). If the load factor is small, it's unlikely to see more than one element there. So, the first element you see should be the element you are looking for. Otherwise, if you have more than one element you must compare the elements you will find in the position with the element you are looking for. In this case you have O(1) + O(number_of_elements).

In the average case, the hash table search complexity is O(1) + O(load_factor) = O(1 + load_factor).

Remember, load_factor = n in the worst case. So, the search complexity is O(n) in the worst case.

I don't know what you mean with "trick behind the memory disposition". Under some points of view, the hash table (with its structure and collisions resolution by chaining) can be considered a "smart trick".

Of course, the hash table analysis results can be proven by math.

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Sorry, but you don't have 65K reputation, so no one will upvote you, despite a well thought out and fleshed out answer. Sucks, I know. – Zoran Pavlovic Aug 19 '12 at 15:42
    
Nevermind, I liked his answer and seemed clear to me :D – Johnny Pauling Aug 19 '12 at 15:55
    
@ZoranPavlovic: you're wrong, I give +1 as well ;-). – Tomasz Nurkiewicz Aug 19 '12 at 16:18
6  
Thank you guys :-) @ZoranPavlovic: I write answers for passion. The upvotes looks like: "I like you reply!" and they help to emphasize the good answers for the community. – bitfox Aug 19 '12 at 17:57
    
How does the load factor = n in the worst case? If the load_factor is n/k where n is the number of elements and k is the size of the array, won't the load_factor be 1 in the worst case, since you cant store more than k elements in the hash table? – Sam P Jan 11 at 12:23

Hash tables are a bit more complex. They put elements in different buckets based on their hash % some value. In an ideal situation, each bucket holds very few items and there aren't many empty buckets.

Once you know the key, you compute the hash. Based on the hash, you know which bucket to look for. And as stated above, the number of items in each bucket should be relatively small.

Hash tables are doing a lot of magic internally to make sure buckets are as small as possible while not consuming too much memory for empty buckets. Also, much depends on the quality of the key -> hash function.

Wikipedia provides very comprehensive description of hash table.

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Hash tables don't always use buckets. – Zoran Pavlovic Aug 19 '12 at 15:43

With arrays: if you know the value, you have to search at most every location (unless sorted) to find its location.

With hashes: the location is generated based on the value. So, given that value again, you can calculated the same hash you calculated when inserting. Sometimes, > 1 value results in the same hash, so on practice each "location" is itself an array of all the values that hash to that location. In this case, only this much smaller (unless it's a bad hash) array needs to be searched.

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I think you answered your own question there. "shouldn't the algorithm compare this hash against every element's hash". That's kind of what it does when it doesn't know the index location of what you're searching for. It compares each element to find the one you're looking for:

E.g. Let's say you're looking for an item called "Car" inside an array of strings. You need to go through every item and check item.Hash() == "Car".Hash() to find out that that is the item you're looking for. Obviously it doesn't use the hash when searching always, but the example stands. Then you have a hash table. What a hash table does is it creates a sparse array, or sometimes array of buckets as the guy above mentioned. Then it uses the "Car".Hash() to deduce where in the sparse array your "Car" item is actually. This means that it doesn't have to search through the entire array to find your item.

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