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In my mind I have a query that goes something like this :

$sort = isset($sort) ? sanitize($_sort) : 'id';

if ($result = $link->prepare("
    SELECT id, price
    FROM items
    ORDER BY ?
"))
{
    $result->bind_param("s", $sort);
    $result->execute();
    etc...
}

When I run this code block without setting the sort variable it runs without an error relating to the use of the ? in the ORDER BY clause and a result set is displayed in what appears to be a result set with "ORDER BY id".

HERE IS THE PROBLEM IN ONE SENTANCE :

Now if i set the sort variable to something like "price ASC" I still get a result set that seems to be "ORDER BY id" instead of "ORDER BY price ASC".

When I run the query as a query in phpmyadmin, it returns the correct result set based on "price ASC" if I define the query that way.

Now, if I alter the code and run it like this :

$sort = isset($sort) ? sanitize($_sort) : 'id';

if ($result = $link->prepare("
    SELECT id, price
    FROM items
    ORDER BY $sort
"))
{
    $result->execute();
    etc...
}

It runs correctly, with a result set that is the same as my query in phpmyadmin...

Could someone please enlighten me as to what exactly is going on here and why the query does not run as I initially intended using bind_param.

In my mind, it should work because no error comes up relating to such use... But in practice it seems that it does not work for an ORDER BY clause. Its almost like it is not translating the sort variable while running bind_param.

Thank you for reading my question and any input relating to it would be greatly appreciated!!

EDIT :

For anyone interested -

if (isset($sort))
{
    $acceptableSortValues = array('name', 'price ASC', 'price DESC');
    $sort = sanitize($sort);
    if (!in_array($sort, $acceptableSortValues))
    {
        $sort = 'name';
    }   
}
else
{
    $sort = 'name';
}

if ($result = $link->prepare("
    SELECT name, price
    FROM items
    ORDER BY $sort
"))
{
    $result->execute();
    etc...
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Only data can be bound with placeholders.

Column/table names are part of the schema and cannot be bound. (The fact that it generates "odd results" instead of simply yielding an error is a peculiarity of the implementation.)

I would suggest using a white-list of column-names and controlled string interpolation.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi and thank you for your comment. I thought that it was a problem with my reasoning. Could you please elaborate further on what it is that you are suggesting as my knowledge of PHP in general is not very great. I have taught myself everything I know but it appears I do not know about things like this :) –  IndigoIdentity Aug 18 '12 at 18:18
    
@BlackberryFan It's not PHP per-say. This is just how placeholders work in [all that I know of] SQL implementations. They allow different data to be substituted for the same shaped query (same columns, table, same joins, same where operators, etc.), but do not allow altering the shape of a query. While a naive implementation could just perform a replace after something like an internal call to mysql_real_escape_string, this would lead to further issues as ORDER BY 'some escaped data' is .. odd at best, and incorrect in general. –  user166390 Aug 18 '12 at 18:21
    
Alright thanks alot and that does make very much sense... But what I do not understand is the work around that you are suggesting here. I understand the issues involved in the second example and this is why I have been trying to convert the query into a prepared statement. I guess what I am asking is what would be the preferred method in dealing with something like this? (in lamens terms :) ) –  IndigoIdentity Aug 18 '12 at 18:24
    
@BlackberryFan To use string interpolation, as done in the last post example (if there is still data, bind that using placeholders as normal). When doing the string interpolation for column names (and column names only), I would recommend using a white-list. That is, only accept the values of "id" and "price" for $sort and reject any other value -- this white-list is the sanitization process for columns. Using an array of "accepted column names" can make this an easy test. –  user166390 Aug 18 '12 at 18:27
1  
Ahh!!! O my goodness that was like an explosion of understanding :) That does make perfect sense as I have actually used things like this before but never quite in those terms... They are to me... "things". But really and truly thank you sooooooooooo much for your input!!! you got it spot on! –  IndigoIdentity Aug 18 '12 at 18:30

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