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Okay I have the following JTextField class. It creates a Rounded JTextField. Now I wanted to use the same setup for my JPasswordField since I thought that JPasswordField inherits from JTextField I could do the following : JPasswordField new_field = new RoundField(SOME Parameters); but that has been a big disaster. Any way to make the JPasswordField rounded without repeating code?

    public class RoundField extends JTextField {
    public RoundField(String text, int x, int y, int width, int height) {
        setText(text);
        setBounds(x, y, width, height);
        setForeground(Color.GRAY);
        setHorizontalAlignment(JTextField.CENTER);
        setOpaque(false);
        setBorder(BorderFactory.createEmptyBorder(2, 4, 2, 4));
    }

    protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        g.setColor(getBackground());
        g.fillRoundRect(0, 0, getWidth(), getHeight(), 8, 8);
        super.paintComponent(g);
    }
}

P.S: It would be okay to move setText out of the constructor if necessary.

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It hurts my eyes to see the tags 'java' and 'multiple-inheritance' in the same question... :) –  aymeric Aug 18 '12 at 19:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

InPursuit is right. You can't solve your problem using inheritance.

But what about using a Factory design patern instead. You would create an external class that would take care of all the UI modification that you currently do in the constructor of your RoundField.

Ex:

class BorderUtil {

    @SuppressWarnings({ "unchecked", "serial" })
    public static <T extends JTextField> T createTextField(T field, String text, int x, int y, int width,
            int height) {

        T f = null;
        if (field instanceof JPasswordField) {
            f = (T) new JPasswordField(text) {
                @Override
                protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
                    g.setColor(getBackground());
                    g.fillRoundRect(0, 0, getWidth(), getHeight(), 8, 8);
                    super.paintComponent(g);
                }
            };
        } else {
            f = (T) new JTextField(text) {
                @Override
                protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
                    g.setColor(getBackground());
                    g.fillRoundRect(0, 0, getWidth(), getHeight(), 8, 8);
                    super.paintComponent(g);
                }
            };
        }

        f.setBounds(x, y, width, height);
        f.setForeground(Color.GRAY);
        f.setHorizontalAlignment(JTextField.CENTER);
        f.setOpaque(false);
        f.setBorder(BorderFactory.createEmptyBorder(2, 4, 2, 4));
        return f;
    }
}

This way, you avoid most duplication and you gain in clarity.

To invoke the method, it's really easy:

JPasswordField pf = BorderUtil.createTextField(yourPasswordField, "Text", 0, 0, 10, 10);
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Haha yes I was just thinking of making another class and using generics. GREAT answer! Thanks a lot! –  foklepoint Aug 18 '12 at 19:14
1  
You're welcome :) –  aymeric Aug 18 '12 at 19:19
    
Quick question: in creating the field, the yourPasswordField parameter, what do I put? –  foklepoint Aug 18 '12 at 19:23
    
Think I figured it out...I send a new JTextField() or JPasswordField() –  foklepoint Aug 18 '12 at 19:34
    
Yes exactly, it's only use is to know which type the function returns... –  aymeric Aug 18 '12 at 21:42

You can't change the class that jpasswordfield is inheriting from so no, there's no way to do this without repeating the code.

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Is there no way to do this using Java Generics? –  foklepoint Aug 18 '12 at 19:04

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