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I made a fonction to return the current date. Inside the function, I "cout" the result and it work but when I "cout" the function, it does not work. I got garbage.

const char* engineCS::getDate() const
{
    time_t t = time(0);
    struct tm *now = localtime(&t);
    char buf[20];
    strftime(buf, sizeof(buf), "%Y-%m-%d %X", now);
    cout << buf << endl;
    return buf;
}

Exemple : Inside : 2012-02-02 00:00:00 Outside : ?????fv

What is wrong? Similar problem : Functions and return const char*

THX

Edit: What is wrong now? Sorry I've done too much VB.NET...

const char* engineCS::getDate() const
{
    time_t t = time(0);
    struct tm *now = localtime(&t);
    char *buf;
    buf = new char[20];
    strftime(buf, sizeof(buf), "%Y-%m-%d %X", now);
    cout << buf << endl;
    return buf;
}
share|improve this question
5  
You're returning a pointer to a local. Don't do that. –  Mysticial Aug 18 '12 at 18:48
3  
The SO question you link to ... answers your question. You can't return a pointer to something on the stack. –  Brian Roach Aug 18 '12 at 18:49
1  
use malloc or new, buff is temporary. Generally It crashes, you got garbage. its UB –  Neel Basu Aug 18 '12 at 18:51
    
I wonder why to use char * when there is std::string in C++? –  Sergey Brunov Aug 18 '12 at 19:10
    
Just to learn the old good way ;) –  Naster Aug 18 '12 at 19:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Change your function to return std::string, and everything will be fine. You won't need to make any further changes apart from the return type. If the consumer needs a raw char const *, call the c_str() member function on the resulting string.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx but I want to learn how to use char * ;) –  Naster Aug 18 '12 at 19:35
2  
@Naster: I can't force your mind, but if you ask me, you should rather learn C++! –  Kerrek SB Aug 18 '12 at 19:59
    
@Naster Instead of "char *buf;" and "buf = new char[20];" try: "static char buf[20];" or for your first example code, just put a "static" in front of "char buf[20];" –  Scooter Aug 19 '12 at 22:08

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