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Googled an hour or so for a good, simple explanation to the following. At what point in:

for i in $(eval echo "{01..30}"); do
    echo $i
done

...does Bash evaluate the '..' component of the brace?

Thanks,

Zack

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2  
why not seq -w 1 30? –  complex857 Aug 18 '12 at 19:03
1  
for i in {01..30};do echo $i; done works too (-: –  complex857 Aug 18 '12 at 19:05
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use set -x in your shell script to see it yourself (Debugging Bash scripts)

set -x
for i in $(eval echo "{01..30}"); do
    echo $i
done

And this is the output:

++ eval echo '{01..30}'
+++ echo 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
+ for i in '$(eval echo "{01..30}")'
+ echo 1
1
+ for i in '$(eval echo "{01..30}")'
+ echo 2
2
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+1 for visible proof –  chepner Aug 18 '12 at 19:14
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To answer your question, the eval command is presented with two arguments: the string "echo" and the string "{01..30}". The brace expansion occurs when eval evaluates the statement formed from those two strings.

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