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I know there have been a lot of questions about sql query performance improvement, but I was not able to use the answers of those questions to improve my queries performance (enough).

Since I wanted something more flexible than rsync & fslint, I've written a little java tool that walks file trees and stores paths & checksums in a mysql database.

You'll find my table structure here: http://code.google.com/p/directory-scanner/source/browse/trunk/sql/create_table.sql - at first I only had one table, but then I thought I could save a lot of space if I move the redundant quite long strings of the directory paths into a seperate place and make it an 1:n relationship

I've defined those two indexes:

CREATE INDEX files_sha1 ON files (sha1);
CREATE INDEX files_size ON files (size);

Now the queries that bug me are those: http://code.google.com/p/directory-scanner/source/browse/trunk/sql/reporingQueries.sql

The worst of them is the last one, that should with a very high probability always return an empty set (sha1 collisions & mistakenly multiple inserted files):

SELECT 
    d.path, 
    d.id, 
    f.filename, 
    f.id, 
    f.size, 
    f.scandate, 
    f.sha1, 
    f.lastmodified 
FROM files f 
INNER JOIN directories d 
    ON d.id = f.dir_id 
WHERE EXISTS ( /* same sha1 but different size */ 
    SELECT ff.id 
    FROM files ff 
    WHERE ff.sha1 = f.sha1 
    AND ff.size <> f.size 
) 
OR EXISTS ( /* files with same name and path but different id */ 
    SELECT ff2.id 
    FROM files ff2 
    INNER JOIN directories dd2 
        ON dd2.id = ff2.dir_id 
    WHERE ff2.id <> f.id 
    AND ff2.filename = f.filename 
    AND dd2.path = d.path 
) 
ORDER BY f.sha1

It ran well enough within less than a second as long as I had only 20k rows (after creating my indexes), but now that I have 750k rows, it literary runs for hours, and mysql totaly uses up one of my cpu cores for the whole time.

EXPLAIN for this query gives this result:

id ; select_type ; table ; type ; possible_keys ; key ; key_len ; ref ; rows ; filtered ; Extra
1 ; PRIMARY ; d ; ALL ; PRIMARY ; NULL ; NULL ; NULL ; 56855 ; 100.0 ; Using temporary; Using filesort
1 ; PRIMARY ; f ; ref ; dir_id ; dir_id ; 4 ; files.d.id ; 13 ; 100.0 ; Using where
3 ; DEPENDENT SUBQUERY ; dd2 ; ALL ; PRIMARY ; NULL ; NULL ; NULL ; 56855 ; 100.0 ; Using where
3 ; DEPENDENT SUBQUERY ; ff2 ; ref ; dir_id ; dir_id ; 4 ; files.dd2.id ; 13 ; 100.0 ; Using where
2 ; DEPENDENT SUBQUERY ; ff ; ref ; files_sha1 ; files_sha1 ; 23 ; files.f.sha1 ; 1 ; 100.0 ; Using where

My other queries are also not quick with 750k rows, but finish at least within 15 minutes or something the like (however, I would like them to also work with millions of rows..)

UPDATE: Thanks radashk for the comment, but the indexes you suggested seem to be created automatically by mysql -->

"Table","Non_unique","Key_name","Seq_in_index","Column_name","Collation","Cardinality","Sub_part","Packed","Null","Index_type","Comment","Index_comment"
"files","0","PRIMARY","1","id","A","698397","NULL","NULL",,"BTREE",,
"files","1","dir_id","1","dir_id","A","53722","NULL","NULL",,"BTREE",,
"files","1","scanDir_id","1","scanDir_id","A","16","NULL","NULL","YES","BTREE",,
"files","1","files_sha1","1","sha1","A","698397","NULL","NULL","YES","BTREE",,
"files","1","files_size","1","size","A","174599","NULL","NULL",,"BTREE",,

UPDATE2: Thanks Eugen Rieck! I consider your answer a good replacement for this query, since it most likly will return an empty set anyway I will just select the data to display the user to describe the problem later in another query. To make me really happy it would be great if someone could take a look at my other queries as well :D

UPDATE3: The answer from Justin Swanhart inspired me to the following solution: instead of having queries to check for directories and files that have been inserted multiple times unintentionally, just create unique constraints like this:

ALTER TABLE directories ADD CONSTRAINT uc_dir_path UNIQUE (path);
ALTER TABLE files ADD CONSTRAINT uc_files UNIQUE(dir_id, filename);

However, I wonder how much this would negatively effect the performance of insert statements, could somebody comment on this please?

UPDATE4:

ALTER TABLE directories ADD CONSTRAINT uc_dir_path UNIQUE (path);

doesn't work, since its to long..

ERROR 1071 (42000): Specified key was too long; max key length is 767 bytes

UPDATE5:

Okey, this is the solution I'm gonna use for replacing the query I quoted above in my initial question:

For the first part, finding sha1 collisions, I will use this:

SELECT sha1
FROM files
GROUP BY sha1
HAVING COUNT(*)>1
AND MIN(size)<>MAX(size)

And if it returns anything, I will select the details with another query WHERE sha1 = ?

I guess this query will run best, with this index defined:

CREATE INDEX sha1_size ON files (sha1, size);

For verifying that no duplicated directories exist, I will use this, since he doesn't allow a constraint (see UPDATE4 above):

SELECT path
FROM directories
GROUP BY path
HAVING COUNT(*)>1

And for the duplicated files I will try to create this constraint:

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX filename_dir ON files (filename, dir_id);

This runs quite fast (15 to 20 sec) and I don't need to create other indexes before it to make it faster. Also the error message contains the details I need to display the problem to the user (which is unlikely anyway since I check for those things before inserting)

Now there are only 5 more queries to make perform in less time ;) thanks for the great help so far Eugen & Justin!

UPDATE6: Okey, so since it's been a few days since the last response from anybody, I'm just gonna accept Justin's answer, since that was the one that helped me the most. I incorporated what I learned from both of you into my app and released version 0.0.4 here: http://code.google.com/p/directory-scanner/downloads/detail?name=directory-scanner-0.0.4-jar-with-dependencies.jar

share|improve this question
    
Index the id`s you connect the tables with! files.id, directories.id –  Samson Aug 18 '12 at 19:20
    
I would put the unique index on (filename, dir_id). You already have an index on (dir_id) for the FOREIGN KEY constraint, and you might want to look up entries by filename, which will not be possible if the index is (dir_id, filename) –  Justin Swanhart Aug 18 '12 at 21:10
    
ah, okey, now I understand what you meant. okey. However, after adding that constraint, he doesn't seem to want to let me remove it again --> ALTER TABLE files DROP INDEX uc_files; ERROR 1553 (HY000): Cannot drop index 'uc_files': needed in a foreign key constraint --> probably he automatically removed the index on dir_id while creating this unique index.. –  kaefert Aug 18 '12 at 21:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

While I can't verify without building your tables an dpopulating, I'd try something like

-- This checks the SHA1 collisions
SELECT
  MIN(id) AS id,
FROM files
GROUP BY sha1
HAVING COUNT(*)>1
AND MIN(size)<>MAX(size)

-- This checks for directory duplicates
SELECT
  MIN(path) AS path
FROM directories
GROUP BY path
HAVING COUNT(*)>1

-- This checks for file duplicates
SELECT
  MIN(f.id) AS id
FROM files AS f
INNER JOIN files AS ff 
   ON f.dir_id=ff.dir_id
   AND f.filename=ff.filename
GROUP BY f.id
HAVING COUNT(*)>1

Run one after the other.

Edit

3rd query was bogous - sorry for that

share|improve this answer
    
Or, union these together to get one list of problems (perhaps with an additional column specifying where the failure is). –  Gordon Linoff Aug 18 '12 at 19:27
    
My rationale for doing it 1-by-1 was e.g. if you have a directory duplicate, you need to fix it first, before file duplicates can be checked in a meaningfull way. –  Eugen Rieck Aug 18 '12 at 19:52
    
Thanks! thats a good idea! The last statement still takes 3 minutes to finish, but a lot better than a few hours ;) would you mind also taking a look at my other queries, or would it be better to create a new question for those? –  kaefert Aug 18 '12 at 20:01
    
You can spped up Query #3 by adding an index on files.filename - I suspect this to be significant, if there are many files/directory. I'll look at your other queries tomorrow - it's saturday midnight here. –  Eugen Rieck Aug 18 '12 at 21:14
    
The third query is better served by (filename, dir_id). The whole thing will then be a loose index scan. You can also remove MIN() from f.id. You are grouping on f.id, so a MIN() on it is meaningless. Same for query two. If you really never ever want to query by filename, then drop the index on dir_id, and create a new unique one (dir_id, filename). I suspect your application will need to query by filename occasionally though, such as for search. –  Justin Swanhart Aug 18 '12 at 21:17

Instead of subqueries try using a UNION and two well indexed queries with joins.

First you will need two indexes (based on the schema in the create_table.sql you provided):

ALTER TABLE files add key (sha1, size);
alter table files add key(filename, dir_id);

Then you will need to rewrite the query:

(SELECT 
    d.path, 
    d.id, 
    f.filename, 
    f.id, 
    f.size, 
    f.scandate, 
    f.sha1, 
    f.lastmodified 
FROM files f 
INNER JOIN directories d 
    ON d.id = f.dir_id 
INNER JOIN files files2
    USING(sha1)
WHERE files2.size != f.size)

UNION

(SELECT 
    d.path, 
    d.id, 
    f.filename, 
    f.id, 
    f.size, 
    f.scandate, 
    f.sha1, 
    f.lastmodified 
FROM files f 
INNER JOIN directories d 
    ON d.id = f.dir_id
INNER JOIN files files2
    ON files2.id != f.id
   AND files2.filename = f.filename
INNER JOIN directories d2
   ON files2.dir_id = d2.id
  AND d2.path = d.path)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer! those alter talbe add key statements, what would this do exactly? would that add an unique constraint on sha1+size? I don't think that that would be a good idea, its more like there should be no different sizes for one sha1, but also this could theoretically happen, and should be insertable. –  kaefert Aug 18 '12 at 20:14
    
Indexes don't have to be UNIQUE. By creating an index on the combination of (sha1,size) you allow the optimizer to do an index-only access on the file table for the self-join. The second index allows an index-only access for the second query. The filename part of the index is used for the join, and the dir_id is in the index already, so it is then used for the directory lookup without accessing the actual row (only the index). –  Justin Swanhart Aug 18 '12 at 20:54
    
Yep, I know they don't have to be unique, but a "key" has to be unique, doesn't it?! I never knew of this "add key" statement, I thought there can be only one primary key in every table, and foreign keys but those are a different matter. I would not have connected "key" with "index" in my head.. –  kaefert Aug 18 '12 at 21:01
    
KEY and INDEX are synonymous in MySQL. ALTER TABLE ADD KEY, ALTER TABLE ADD INDEX and CREATE INDEX all do the same thing. –  Justin Swanhart Aug 18 '12 at 21:05
    
oh... okey, thanks for the clarifications! I guess I would need to profile that, but I don't want to create to many indexes, because those would probably negatively effect insert & update performance.. –  kaefert Aug 18 '12 at 21:14

Do you take a kind of cross join in your second subquery. Try to change second subquery to:

SELECT ff2.id 
FROM files ff2 
WHERE ff2.id <> f.id 
AND ff2.dir_id  = d.dir_id 
AND ff2.filename = f.filename 

and create an index over dir_id, filename on files table.

share|improve this answer
    
well I did that on purpose, since it would also be possible (and likely) that both the directory and the file is inserted twice, then the dir_id would not be the same, only the directory.path would be the same, therefore the extra join. I think splitting the questions in 3 statements like Eugen Rieck suggested and only ask if there are duplicate files after having established that there are no duplicate directories. –  kaefert Aug 18 '12 at 20:19

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