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A server sends me a $_POST request in the following format:

POST {
  array1
  {
    info1,
    info2,
    info3
  },
  info4
}

So naturally, I could extract the info# very simply with $_POST['#info']. But how do I get the the three info's in the array1? I tried $_POST['array1']['info1'] to no avail.

Thanks!

 a:2:  {s:7:"payload";s:59:"{"amount":25,"adjusted_amount":17.0,"uid":"jiajia"}";s:9:"signature";s:40:"53764f33e087e418dbbc1c702499203243f759d4";}

is the serialized version of the POST

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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Use index notation:

$_POST['array1'][0]
$_POST['array1'][1]
$_POST['array1'][2] 

If you need to iterate over a variable response:

for ($i = 0, $l = count($_POST['array1']); $i < $l; $i++) {
    doStuff($_POST['array1'][$i]);
}

This more or less takes this shape in plain PHP:

$post = array();
$post['info'] = '#';
$post['array1'] = array('info1', 'info2', 'info3');

http://codepad.org/1QZVOaw4

So you can see it's really just an array in an array, with numeric indices.


Note, if it's an associative array, you need to use foreach():

foreach ($_POST['array1'] as $key => $val) {
    doStuff($key, $val);
}

http://codepad.org/WW7U5qmN

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same as above...shows individual characters rather than the value. –  Yinan Wang Aug 18 '12 at 20:26
    
Then what you posted wasn't accurate to what you're actually handling. :) –  Jared Farrish Aug 18 '12 at 20:27
    
Yeah well can't do anything about that. Server that posts the data isn't mine. SIGHS This is what you get when you try to translate Ruby to PHP... –  Yinan Wang Aug 18 '12 at 20:30
    
You don't understand me; see: codepad.org/aSLR61El Notice how similar that is to what you included as representing your actual POST array? That's the problem, what you demonstrated doesn't appear to be what you actually receive. –  Jared Farrish Aug 18 '12 at 20:32
    
See edit. Not info#, but info4 –  Yinan Wang Aug 18 '12 at 20:34
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try

$_POST['array1'][0]
$_POST['array1'][1]
$_POST['array1'][2]
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index notation ended up showing individual characters....weird. –  Yinan Wang Aug 18 '12 at 20:25
    
user for loop like ($counter=0;$counter<count($_post['array1']);$counter++){ $_POST['array1'][$counter]; } –  GujjuDeveloper Aug 18 '12 at 20:34
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You can simply use a foreach loop on the $_POST

foreach($_POST["array1"] as $info)
{
    echo $info;
}

or you can access them by their index:

for($i = 0; $i<sizeof($_POST["array1"]); $i++)
{
    echo $_POST["array1"][$i];
}
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Will extract work? It worked for info# and got me a serialized array1, but what about the contents of array1? –  Yinan Wang Aug 18 '12 at 20:28
    
Well you should try messing abit arround with it you can also just do an foreach($_POST as $post) and then loop down through that data you might wanna use <pre><%print_r($_POST);%></pre> while playing arround with it to see how your post is really formated. –  bsthomsen Aug 18 '12 at 20:34
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