Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I'm trying to know whether a kernel is 64 or 32 in #!/bin/sh.

I build this code!

krnl=$(uname -i)

# Check whether 64 or 32 bit kernel and download the correct version;
if [ $krnl='i386' ] ; then # 32
  # Do 32-bits stuff
else
  # Do 64-bits stuff
fi

But it seems to return always true. What I'm doing wrong, Why this is happening and how I can fix this? What I googled always show me in bash or doesn't work.

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by ant, nandeesh, fedorqui, oberlies, mezoid Mar 6 at 22:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
$ uname -i gives GenuineIntel for me. –  Michał Górny Aug 18 '12 at 21:57
    
@MichałGórny Are you ubuntu user? –  waldyr.ar Aug 18 '12 at 22:00
    
@ant There are some difference. But if you think so I can delete. –  waldyr.ar Aug 18 '12 at 22:01
    
it's not up to me alone to decide Sir, this is my opinion. Please do not delete based on my opinion –  ant Aug 18 '12 at 22:02
1  
have you tried other options from the answer I marked as duplicate? i.e. getconf LONG_BIT should return 64 or 32. Also have you used == instead of = in your if statement ? stackoverflow.com/a/7308155/169277 what does uname -a print ? –  ant Aug 18 '12 at 22:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Spaces are needed around '=' sign to properly test $krnl value:

krnl=$(uname -i)

# Check whether 64 or 32 bit kernel and download the correct version;
if [ $krnl = 'i386' ] ; then # 32
  # Do 32-bits stuff
else
  # Do 64-bits stuff
fi
share|improve this answer

You have to put spaces around the equals sign in the [ command. Otherwise, it gets a single argument and returns true if that argument is not an empty string, which it will never be.

Also, uname -m might be better. I get "unknown" from uname -i on an amd64 machine.

share|improve this answer

Whitesapce is significant in bash. You need spaces around the '=' character, like so:

if [ $krnl = 'i386' ] ; then # 32

Otherwise, you've defined a long string "x86_64=i386" or "i386=i386", and the non-empty string returns true.

share|improve this answer

On my machine, uname -p returns i686 whereas uname -i returns i386.

share|improve this answer

In my console uname -m, uname -i and uname -p return x86_64 so :

krnl=`uname -i`

if [ $krnl="x86_64" ] ; then # 64
  echo "64"
else
  echo "32"
fi

should work works on my machine.

Update :

krnl=`uname -i`
if [ "$krnl" == "x86_64" ]; then
        echo "64"
else
        echo "32"
fi

When I change to :

if [ "$krnl" != "x86_64" ]; then

echoes 32

share|improve this answer
    
You haven't fixed the spacing problem, all you did is reverse it so it always takes the 64 branch instead of always taking the 32 branch. It's still wrong. –  Alan Curry Aug 18 '12 at 21:45
    
you were right but for different reasons (I didn't just swap). take a look at the edited question –  ant Aug 18 '12 at 21:55
    
this is the correct answer I see no reason for down-vote stackoverflow.com/a/106416/169277 –  ant Aug 18 '12 at 21:59
    
The updated version is not as bad. The first one is just wrong. Using == in a [ command is a bashism though. –  Alan Curry Aug 18 '12 at 22:12
    
true story, = '' works as well –  ant Aug 18 '12 at 22:13

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.