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I am trying to parse a -temp option with Bash getopts. I'm calling my script like this:

./myscript -temp /foo/bar/someFile

Here is the code I'm using to parse the options.

while getopts "temp:shots:o:" option; do
    case $option in
        temp) TMPDIR="$OPTARG" ;;
        shots) NUMSHOTS="$OPTARG" ;;
        o) OUTFILE="$OPTARG" ;;
        *) usage ;;
    esac
done
shift $(($OPTIND - 1))

[ $# -lt 1 ] && usage
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6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

As already mentioned, getopts can only parse short options. Most systems also have an external getopt command, but getopt is not standard, and is generally broken by design as it can't handle all arguments safely (arguments with whitespace and empty arguments), only GNU getopt can handle them safely, but only if you use it in a GNU-specific way.

The easier choice is to use neither, just iterate the script's arguments with a while-loop and do the parsing yourself. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/035 for an example.

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getopts is used by shell procedures to parse positional parameters of 1 character only (no GNU-style long options (--myoption) or XF86-style long options (-myoption))

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You can't use the getopts Bash builtin for long options--at least, not without having to build your own parsing functions. You should take a look at the /usr/bin/getopt binary instead (provided on my system by the util-linux package; your mileage may vary).

See getopt(1) for specific invocation options.

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As other people explained, getopts doesn't parse long options. You can use getopt, but it's not portable (and it is broken on some platform...)

As a workaround, you can implement a shell loop. Here an example that transforms long options to short ones before using the standard getopts command (it's simpler in my opinion):

# Transform long options to short ones
for arg in "$@"; do
  shift
  case "$arg" in
    "--help") set -- "$@" "-h" ;;
    "--rest") set -- "$@" "-r" ;;
    "--ws")   set -- "$@" "-w" ;;
    *)        set -- "$@" "$arg"
  esac
done

# Default behavior
rest=false; ws=false

# Parse short options
OPTIND=1
while getopts "hrw" opt
do
  case "$opt" in
    "h") print_usage; exit 0 ;;
    "r") rest=true ;;
    "w") ws=true ;;
    "?") print_usage >&2; exit 1 ;;
  esac
done
shift $(expr $OPTIND - 1) # remove options from positional parameters
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It's true that builtin bash getopts only parse short options, but you can still add few lines of scripting to make getopts handles long options.

Here is a part of code found in http://www.uxora.com/unix/shell-script/22-handle-long-options-with-getopts

  #== set options ==#
SCRIPT_OPTS=':fbF:B:-:h'
typeset -A ARRAY_OPTS
ARRAY_OPTS=(
    [foo]=f
    [bar]=b
    [foobar]=F
    [barfoo]=B
    [help]=h
    [man]=h
)

  #== parse options ==#
while getopts ${SCRIPT_OPTS} OPTION ; do
    #== translate long options to short ==#
    if [[ "x$OPTION" == "x-" ]]; then
        LONG_OPTION=$OPTARG
        LONG_OPTARG=$(echo $LONG_OPTION | grep "=" | cut -d'=' -f2)
        LONG_OPTIND=-1
        [[ "x$LONG_OPTARG" = "x" ]] && LONG_OPTIND=$OPTIND || LONG_OPTION=$(echo $OPTARG | cut -d'=' -f1)
        [[ $LONG_OPTIND -ne -1 ]] && eval LONG_OPTARG="\$$LONG_OPTIND"
        OPTION=${ARRAY_OPTS[$LONG_OPTION]}
        [[ "x$OPTION" = "x" ]] &&  OPTION="?" OPTARG="-$LONG_OPTION"

        if [[ $( echo "${SCRIPT_OPTS}" | grep -c "${OPTION}:" ) -eq 1 ]]; then
            if [[ "x${LONG_OPTARG}" = "x" ]] || [[ "${LONG_OPTARG}" = -* ]]; then 
                OPTION=":" OPTARG="-$LONG_OPTION"
            else
                OPTARG="$LONG_OPTARG";
                if [[ $LONG_OPTIND -ne -1 ]]; then
                    [[ $OPTIND -le $Optnum ]] && OPTIND=$(( $OPTIND+1 ))
                    shift $OPTIND
                    OPTIND=1
                fi
            fi
        fi
    fi

    #== options follow by another option instead of argument ==#
    if [[ "x${OPTION}" != "x:" ]] && [[ "x${OPTION}" != "x?" ]] && [[ "${OPTARG}" = -* ]]; then 
        OPTARG="$OPTION" OPTION=":"
    fi

    #== manage options ==#
    case "$OPTION" in
        f  ) foo=1 bar=0                    ;;
        b  ) foo=0 bar=1                    ;;
        B  ) barfoo=${OPTARG}               ;;
        F  ) foobar=1 && foobar_name=${OPTARG} ;;
        h ) usagefull && exit 0 ;;
        : ) echo "${SCRIPT_NAME}: -$OPTARG: option requires an argument" >&2 && usage >&2 && exit 99 ;;
        ? ) echo "${SCRIPT_NAME}: -$OPTARG: unknown option" >&2 && usage >&2 && exit 99 ;;
    esac
done
shift $((${OPTIND} - 1))

Here is a test:

# Short options test
$ ./foobar_any_getopts.sh -bF "Hello world" -B 6 file1 file2
foo=0 bar=1
barfoo=6
foobar=1 foobar_name=Hello world
files=file1 file2

# Long and short options test
$ ./foobar_any_getopts.sh --bar -F Hello --barfoo 6 file1 file2
foo=0 bar=1
barfoo=6
foobar=1 foobar_name=Hello
files=file1 file2

Otherwise in recent Korn Shell ksh93, getopts can naturally parse long options and even display a man page alike. (see http://www.uxora.com/unix/shell-script/20-getopts-with-man-page-and-long-options)

Michel VONGVILAY.

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Although this question was posted over 2 years ago, I found myself needing support for XFree86-style long options too; and I also wanted to take what I could from getopts. Consider the GCC switch -rdynamic. I mark r as the flag letter, and expect dynamic within $OPTARG...but, I want to reject -r dynamic, while accepting other options following r.

The idea I've put below builds on the observation that $OPTIND will be one larger than otherwise if space (a gap) follows the flag. So, I define a bash variable to hold the previous value of $OPTIND, called $PREVOPTIND, and update it at the end of the while loop. If $OPTIND is 1 greater than $PREVOPTIND, we have no gap (i.e. -rdynamic); and $GAP is set to false. If instead $OPTIND is 2 greater than $PREVOPTIND, we do have a gap (e.g. -r dynamic), and $GAP is set to true.

usage() { echo usage: error from $1; exit -1; }

OPTIND=1
PREVOPTIND=$OPTIND
while getopts "t:s:o:" option; do
  GAP=$((OPTIND-(PREVOPTIND+1)))
  case $option in
    t) case "${OPTARG}" in
         emp)                  # i.e. -temp
           ((GAP)) && usage "-${option} and ${OPTARG}"
           TMPDIR="$OPTARG"
           ;;
         *)
           true
           ;;
       esac
       ;;
    s) case "${OPTARG}" in
         hots)                 # i.e. -shots
           ((GAP)) && usage
           NUMSHOTS="$OPTARG"
           ;;
         *) usage "-${option} and ${OPTARG}" ;;
       esac
       ;;
    o) OUTFILE="$OPTARG" ;;
    *) usage "-${option} and ${OPTARG}" ;;
  esac
  PREVOPTIND=$OPTIND
done
shift $(($OPTIND - 1))
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