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In PHP, I noticed that if I have an array and then json_encode() it, the boolean values get converted to true and false. However, I want them to be converted to 1 and 0, respectively.

Here's an example:

$data = Array("foo" => true, "bar" => false, "baz" => false, "biz" => true);
print json_encode($data);

The above outputs:

{"foo":true,"bar":false,"baz":false,"biz":true}

However, if true and false were 1 and 0 instead, we could have a shorter string, which would take less time to transfer over the Internet:

{"foo":1,"bar":0,"baz":0,"biz":1}

How can I make PHP encode JSON using 1 and 0 instead of true and false?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I figured it out. You can use the array_walk or array_walk_recursive function in PHP to cast the booleans to integers before encoding the JSON. I wrote a function to do that:

function change_booleans_to_numbers(Array $data){
    // Note the order of arguments and the & in front of $value 
    function converter(&$value, $key){
        if(is_bool($value)){
            $value = ($value ? 1 : 0);
        }
    }
    array_walk_recursive($data, 'converter');
    return $data;
}

Here's a demonstration script:

<?php
// Make the browser display this as plain text instead of HTML 
header("Content-Type:text/plain");

function change_booleans_to_numbers(Array $data){
    function converter(&$value, $key){
        if(is_bool($value)){
            $value = ($value ? 1 : 0);
        }
    }
    array_walk_recursive($data, 'converter');
    return $data;
}

$data = Array("foo" => true, "bar" => false, "baz" => false, "biz" => true);

print "Original:" . PHP_EOL;
var_dump($data);
print json_encode($data) . PHP_EOL;
print PHP_EOL;

$changed = change_booleans_to_numbers($data);
print "Processed:" . PHP_EOL;
var_dump($changed);
print json_encode($changed) . PHP_EOL;

The script outputs:

Original:
array(4) {
  ["foo"]=>
  bool(true)
  ["bar"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["baz"]=>
  bool(false)
  ["biz"]=>
  bool(true)
}
{"foo":true,"bar":false,"baz":false,"biz":true}

Processed:
array(4) {
  ["foo"]=>
  int(1)
  ["bar"]=>
  int(0)
  ["baz"]=>
  int(0)
  ["biz"]=>
  int(1)
}
{"foo":1,"bar":0,"baz":0,"biz":1}
share|improve this answer
6  
I strongly encourage you to use "true" and "false" (NOT "1" or "0") whenever possible in your JSON messages. Doing otherwise is just poor form. IMHO... –  paulsm4 Aug 18 '12 at 22:58
1  
I'm more concerned about how long it's going to take to download the JSON. –  wecsam Aug 19 '12 at 0:27
3  
If you're seriously trying to save 3 bytes by using 1/0 instead of true/false there's a 99.9999% chance you're prematurely optimizing. And if you aren't, you're engaging in dubious micro-optimization. There are so many more important things like database and filesystem access that have so much more impact on performance. You should listen to @paulsm4. –  rdlowrey Aug 19 '12 at 1:07
1  
I'm really struggling to figure out why you think that the GZIP compression offered by your post-1992 web server won't handle the extra few bytes added by "true" instead of 1. You're misrepresenting the type of the value by representing the bool as an int. –  Lusitanian Aug 19 '12 at 1:34
1  
Oh, yeah, I forgot that my web server has GZIP enabled. –  wecsam Aug 19 '12 at 2:59

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