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I have this code in .NET:

 result = NativeMethods.gsapi_init_with_args(_ghostScriptInstance, args.Length, _argumentPointersHandle.AddrOfPinnedObject());

That in its turn executes this code

[DllImport("C:\\gsdll64.dll", EntryPoint = "gsapi_init_with_args")]
public static extern int gsapi_init_with_args(IntPtr instance, int argc, IntPtr argv);

The problem is that because of yet unknown problem the native execution enters into an infinite loop and never returns.

The question is how can I cap the execution time of this native thing. Can I like tell .NET somehow that if NativeMethods.gsapi_init_with_args doesn't return within a minute then kill the native execution and return?

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@HansPassant The way it works on SO is that if you don't have an answer to the question, you don't get to post. I have flagged your comment as not constructive / off-topic. –  user1561202 Aug 19 '12 at 0:19
    
@user1561202 Flagged your comments as not constructive. –  Waleed Khan Aug 19 '12 at 0:58

1 Answer 1

Probably call the method in a new thread and kill the thread if the call does not complete in time. Killing thread is bad, but in this particular case I am assuming that you don't have access to the source code of the native function.

Somehow Thread.Abort does not work (will try to figure out how the interop threading stuff works), rather than creating a managed thread you can create a native thread using CreateThread and terminate it after a timeout.

[DllImport("Library.dll")]
public static extern void InfiniteLoop();

[DllImport("kernel32")]
private static extern int CreateThread(
   IntPtr lpThreadAttributes,
   UInt32 dwStackSize,
   IntPtr lpStartAddress,
   IntPtr param,
   UInt32 dwCreationFlags,
   UInt32 lpThreadId
 );

[DllImport("Kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
public static extern int TerminateThread(int hThread);

[DllImport("Kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
public static extern int GetLastError();

private delegate int InvokeInfiniteLoop(IntPtr args);

static void Main(string[] args)
{
      InvokeInfiniteLoop invokeInfiniteLoop = (args1) =>
                                                    {
                                                        InfiniteLoop();
                                                        return 0;
                                                    };
     IntPtr infiniteLoopPtr = Marshal.GetFunctionPointerForDelegate(invokeInfiniteLoop);
     int handle = CreateThread(IntPtr.Zero, 0, infiniteLoopPtr, IntPtr.Zero, 0, 0);
     Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
     int terminated = TerminateThread(handle);
     Console.WriteLine(terminated);
}

A word of caution, terminating thread is dangerous, you can read all about it here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms686717(v=vs.85).aspx. HansPassant is right, if the source is available you can debug it and figure out the bug.

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Thanks, but this does not work. The thread workaround that you have suggested does allow me to release and continue the .NET code execution, but the native code continues to execute behind the scenes. –  user1561202 Aug 19 '12 at 2:18
    
Somehow Thread.Abort does not work (will try to figure out how the interop threading stuff works), rather than creating a managed thread you can create a native thread using CreateThread and terminate it after a timeout. I have updated the answer with source. –  FaisalMansoor Aug 19 '12 at 9:05
    
After further research looks like(as I suspected from the beginning) that this workaround is completely wrong. Creating and Terminating the unmanaged code will leak the stack. I will have to create a separate executable that will be terminated by Process.Kill(); –  user1561202 Aug 21 '12 at 2:30

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