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I was thinking of keeping three pieces of information for each object of a list. So I can create a class with three properties for those three pieces of information, and then create a Collection of that class type... But I was wondering in .NET 3.5 ( and not 4.0 ) have any thing built in for that? for example a dictionary...that one keep two pieces of information for each item, key and value...but I need three. Do we have anything built-in for that?

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1  
I suppose you could use List<Tuple<A, B, C>> but are you looking for specific semantics? –  ChaosPandion Aug 18 '12 at 23:59
    
stackoverflow.com/a/9163732/726127 –  Brad Aug 21 '12 at 16:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can create your own Tuple<T1, T2, T3>:

public class Tuple<T1, T2, T3> : IEquatable<Object>{
    public T1 Item1{
        get;
        set;
    }

    public T2 Item2{
        get;
        set;
    }

    public T3 Item3{
        get;
        set;
    }

    public Tuple(T1 Item1, T2 Item2, T3 Item3){
         this.Item1 = Item1;
         this.Item2 = Item2;
         this.Item3 = Item3;
    }

    public override bool Equals( object obj ) {
        if ( obj == null || (obj as Tuple<T1, T2, T3>) == null ) //if the object is null or the cast fails
            return false;
        else {
            Tuple<T1,T2,T3> tuple = ( Tuple<T1, T2, T3> ) obj;
            return Item1.Equals( tuple.Item1 ) && Item2.Equals(tuple.Item2) && Item3.Equals(tuple.Item3);
        }
    }

    public override int GetHashCode( ) {
        return Item1.GetHashCode( ) ^ Item2.GetHashCode() ^ Item3.GetHashCode();
    }

    public static bool operator == ( Tuple<T1, T2, T3> tuple1, Tuple<T1, T2, T3> tuple2 ) {
        return tuple1.Equals( tuple2 );
    }

    public static bool operator != ( Tuple<T1, T2, T3> tuple1, Tuple<T1, T2, T3> tuple2 ) {
        return !tuple1.Equals( tuple2 );
    }
}
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Cools, just a minor edit to your code: Item2 and Item3 should be of types T2 and T3, prob a copy paste error :) –  Bohn Aug 19 '12 at 0:14
2  
I like this solution because as @ChaosPandion points out, it follows what is built into .NET 4.0. When you upgrade you can remove this class altogether. –  dana Aug 19 '12 at 0:14
    
@BDotA Oh sorry, fixed. –  Fuex Aug 19 '12 at 0:15
2  
If you're intending to do equality comparisons with the tuple you really need to make it immutable and implement Equals and a suitable GetHashCode. The tuple as it is defined will give you unexpected results for comparisons. –  Enigmativity Aug 19 '12 at 0:32
    
@Enigmativity oh thanks, didn't know that.. I want it to keep a string and two of my own classes so like <String, OwlClass, OwlAnnotation> ... But no "comparison" I will do .. will it still be a problem? Then I am gonna have a ICollection of objects of this Tuple class. –  Bohn Aug 19 '12 at 0:37

Create your own Triple class:

public class Triple<T,X,Y>
{
   public T t{get;set;}
   public X x{get;set;}
   public Y y{get;set;}
}

It's clear way and more manageable than ways like : Dictionary<Key, KeyValuePair<X,Y>> and other approaches like this.

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yes, looks like thats the only way to do it, Tuples are for .NET 4.0 –  Bohn Aug 19 '12 at 0:04
2  
I would actually follow the convention used in .NET 4 for tuples so you can easily swap them out if you so desire. –  ChaosPandion Aug 19 '12 at 0:04
    
@ChaosPandion : thanks, what do you mean by "follow convention used in .NET 4 for tuples" ? –  Bohn Aug 19 '12 at 0:06
1  
I think he means "syntax and semantics" rather than "convention". –  Enigmativity Aug 19 '12 at 0:08
    
@Saeed:Copy Pasted the Triple class, it gives me errors saying "Member with the same name is already declared. –  Bohn Aug 19 '12 at 0:12

The solution of creating a generic tuple class similar to the one that's added in .Net 4 is explained in other answers, but I do feel it's important to state that it might be better to create a small class to semantically represent the data you're storing with meaningful properties. A generic 3-tuple might work now, but you might want to expand on the functionality later.

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You make an important point. Tuple is most appropriate when used internally within a module or a generally small project. –  ChaosPandion Aug 19 '12 at 0:25
    
Exactly. A great and natural time for Tuple<...> is when you're implementing an algorithm that's really abstract like a really obscure graph algorithm or math algorithm or something. –  jwrush Aug 19 '12 at 0:26

Try Dictionary<Key, Tuple<Object, Object>> or, alternatively, Dictionary<Key, YourClass> where YourClass (which could be a struct, of course), holds the two required pieces of data.

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2  
Tuple isn't available in .NET 3.5. –  Kendall Frey Aug 19 '12 at 0:01
2  
@Kendall - You are technically correct but it is trivial to implement. –  ChaosPandion Aug 19 '12 at 0:02
    
@KendallFrey: Edited for an alternative. –  CesarGon Aug 19 '12 at 0:04

If you were using .NET 4, you'd be looking for Tuple<T1,T2,T3>. .NET 3.5 doesn't have a built-in type, but depending on your needs, you can do a Dictionary<T1,Dictionary<T2,Dictionary<T3,bool>>>

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