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Should I write

class MyClass:
     def __init__(self):
         self.field = 0

or

class MyClass:
     def __init__(self):
         field = 0

Is there any difference between these statements?

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I'm don't think the latter sets MyClass.field. –  Waleed Khan Aug 19 '12 at 0:11
    
@arxanas: Thanks –  i love stackoverflow Aug 19 '12 at 0:11
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, you must use the self variable to set the properties of Python objects/instances.

In the second case, you're just creating a local variable in __init__, not defining a property.

class MyClass:
    def __init__(self):
        field = 0

print MyClass().field # an error! it's not defined!

You may be misled by the way that you can just use raw assignments in class blocks to set class properties:

class MyClass:
    a = 2

print MyClass.a # 2

The behaviour in class blocks is unusual, and you don't get similar behaviour inside methods.

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The first chunk of code creates an instance attribute that can be accessed once an instance of the class has been created:

>>> a = MyClass()
>>> a.field
0

The scope of the second chunk's field variable is only within the __init__ function, so accessing the variable outside of that scope won't work:

>>> a = MyClass()
>>> a.field
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: MyClass instance has no attribute 'field'
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The former sets the value as a property of the class. The latter, as simply a local variable.

If elsewhere in your program you do

foo = MyClass();
print foo.field;

The print statement above will only work with the first code snippet, not with the second.

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