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I wrote this small program to print multiplication tables. I was understanding the local variables then I added two variables with same name in each function. but it is running and I am not getting any 2 variables with same name error. Please help me understand the idea here -

def printMultiples(n):
    i = 1
    i = 5
    while i <= 10:
        print n*i, '\t',
        i = i + 1
    print

def printMultTable():
    i = 1
    i = 10
    while i <= 10:
        printMultiples(i)
        i = i + 1
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5 Answers 5

The variable i gets defined as soon as the function is run, it does not wait until the lines

i = 1
i = 10

are run. When the code is compiled, Python looks at every variable that is assigned in the function, and creates definitions for any that aren't declared to be global or nonlocal.

Each i = line will just change the value, it doesn't cause it to be defined again.

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Here's what's happening in your script:

i = 1

creates the variable i and assigns the value 1 to it

i = 5

replaces the value held in i with 5

while i <= 10:

starts your loop

    print n*i, '\t',

The first iteration of the loop will print n * 5 and a tab character

    i = i + 1

increments i by one

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1  
You won't actually get a NameError, because n is a function parameter. –  zigg Aug 19 '12 at 0:29
    
Doh! Guess I missed that... thanks –  Joe Day Aug 19 '12 at 0:30

There aren't two variables with the same name, there's one variable that is being assigned to twice.

i = 1  # i is declared and assigned to 1
i = 5  # the same i is reassigned to 5
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Well, did this answer your question? Don't forget to upvote/accept answers to your questions :) –  Andrew Marshall Sep 8 '12 at 16:13

In python, symbols are just names for variables. They are do not allocate memory as they do for say, C/C++. So what you are doing is simply reassigning the values to 'i' in each case.

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You're not actually creating two variables with the same name; your second i = is reassigning i to a new value, same as i = i + 1 is setting i to the value of i + 1.

There are more Pythonic ways to deal with looping a fixed number of times, by the way:

for i in range(1, 11):
    printMultiples(i)

This will execute printMultiples for values starting in 1 and less than 11.

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