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I'm sort of newish to Python, I've hit a really weird problem with my dictionary that I just can't seem to figure out.

Basically I have a class called World which has a dictionary self.islands = {} the problem is when I want to add an instance of my Island class using the method addIsland(island) in World I get the error:

AttributeError: World instance has no attribute 'islands'

on the line:

self.islands[island.name] = island

self.islands definitely exists because I initialize it in World's __init__ as follows:

class World():
    def __init__(showBase, self):        
        self.islands = {}
        ...

The addIsland method is:

def addIsland(self, island):
    island.setWorld(self)
    self.islands[island.name] = island

And that method is called from the base class's __init__ (which main runs) as follows:

self.world = World(self)
self.setupIslands()

self.setupIslands() looks like:

def setupIslands(self):
    #Island 1
    island1 = IslandCross()
    self.world.addIsland(island1)

Sorry if it is a bit confusing but basically I've got 3 classes, the base one that has a main, in it's __init__ it calls self.world = World(self) then self.setupIslands().

World's __init__ has the line self.islands = {} and the method addIsland() which tries to add an Island to the dictionary with the key as the island's name (island.name) and it's value as the island instance itself.

What am I doing wrong here? I'm pretty sure I've got this kind of setup working in other places in my projects.

I bet it's something stupid and simple isn't it :)

Thanks for your time,

InfinitiFizz

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Note that lowerCamelCase is not a standard for Python in most cases}. You should use variables and method names like "setup_islands", "is_land", etc. You can use CamelCase for Class names. –  martincho Aug 19 '12 at 1:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The self-reference is the first argument to methods.

def __init__(self, showBase):
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Gaaaaaaaaaaaah! Thank you very much! I've written class ****(self, showBase): about 200 times as well! It must be the lack of sleep! Thanks so much for the help @Ignacio :) –  poncho Aug 19 '12 at 1:40

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