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Just updated to latest xCode 4.41 and now I'm getting a ton of warnings about perfectly fine code (see subject line). These warnings are in 3rd party source code that I'm using, I don't feel like going into that code and editing (I'd have to do it again next time I update that code) so I'd rather just disable that particular warning.

By the way, I'm using xcode4.41 but apparently I don't have a good enough reputation to be able to create a new tag (interesting though that 4.41 is not already in there)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

This worked for me:

#ifdef __llvm__
#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wdangling-else"
#endif
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Does that pragma just get rid of the braces warning? If so, that's much better although one will have to remember to insert that pragma into every source file unless there's a way to add pragmas to xCode definitions. –  David Aug 24 '12 at 1:07
    
Yes, it seems so. We have a common header in all our sources, so I put it there. –  PatchyFog Sep 14 '12 at 18:38
    
great answer;-) will me much more helpful,if you could clarify how this works –  MicRO Jan 8 '13 at 5:10

OK --- there's an option under Apple LLVM compiler 4.0 - Warnings called

Missing Braces and Parentheses

Setting that to NO gets rid of this warning.

Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be a way to JUST get rid of the braces warning.

Apple, you're starting to impose too much on how I develop. Stop!

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1  
imo it's a bug, but apple developer support has his own definition of dangling-else: This is only a style warning. This code is inherently hard to read, which is why the warning exists. If you do not like the warning you can silence it by passing -Wno-dangling-else to the compiler. –  peko May 24 '13 at 13:49

Its not a bug. Apple LLVM warns you in cases where you have a nested if-else if-else block. Look at the code below:

if (Condition1)
    if (Condition2)
        return Statement2;
    else if (Condition3)
        Statement3;
    else
        Statement4;

By looking at the above code, its confusing for the parser to understand to which 'if' the 'else' is connected with? Remember that its not mandatory to have a else for every else-if, so it can be very likely that the else statement might be linked to the if (Condition1) rather than if (Condition2).

Apple llvm Compiler is smart enough to not make this folly but warns the user to reconsider the code to make sure that the user didn't want it the other way.

Generally the warning can be resolved by adding braces to the all the top level if statements. In the example above, the warning would go away by adding braces to if (Condition1). Check the more readable (warning less) code below:

if (Condition1)
{
    if (Condition2)
        return Statement2;
    else if (Condition3)
        Statement3;
    else
        Statement4;
}
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This is just bad formatting style. –  Bitterblue Nov 20 '13 at 14:58
2  
No it is not confusing for the parser. The else refers to the last if statement. @Eve The "bad formatting style" is subjective. –  Michaelangelo May 29 at 18:43

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