Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

My understanding is, if I use "Add refenrce" to add some DLLs to my project, these reference info will be stored in the *.csproj file like below, and it should be stored in the assembly manifest after compilation.

<Reference Include="Microsoft.VisualStudio.QualityTools.CodedUITestFramework, Version=11.0.0.0,
 Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a, processorArchitecture=MSIL">

And these info should be be reflected in the assembly metadata manifest, which could be checked with ILDasm.exe.

But I noticed that some referenced DLL only shows up in the *.csproj file, but not in the assembly manifest.

Such as:

In *.csproj, I have:

    <Reference Include="Microsoft.VisualStudio.QualityTools.CodedUITestFramework, Version=11.0.0.0,
 Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a, processorArchitecture=MSIL">
      <SpecificVersion>False</SpecificVersion>
      <HintPath>..\..\..\Microsoft.VisualStudio.QualityTools.CodedUITestFramework.dll</HintPath>
    </Reference>
    <Reference Include="Microsoft.VisualStudio.QualityTools.UnitTestFramework, Version=10.0.0.0,
 Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a, processorArchitecture=MSIL">
      <SpecificVersion>False</SpecificVersion>
      <HintPath>..\..\..\Microsoft.VisualStudio.QualityTools.UnitTestFramework.dll</HintPath>
    </Reference>
    <Reference Include="Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UITest.Common, Version=11.0.0.0,
 Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a, processorArchitecture=MSIL">
      <SpecificVersion>False</SpecificVersion>
      <HintPath>..\..\..\Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UITest.Common.dll</HintPath>
    </Reference>
    <Reference Include="Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UITest.Extension, Version=11.0.0.0,
 Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a, processorArchitecture=MSIL">
      <SpecificVersion>False</SpecificVersion>
      <HintPath>..\..\..\Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UITest.Extension.dll</HintPath>
    </Reference>
    <Reference Include="Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UITesting, Version=11.0.0.0,
 Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b03f5f7f11d50a3a, processorArchitecture=MSIL">
      <SpecificVersion>False</SpecificVersion>
      <HintPath>..\..\..\Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UITesting.dll</HintPath>
    </Reference>

But in assembly manifest, I only see this:

.assembly extern Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UITesting
{
  .publickeytoken = (B0 3F 5F 7F 11 D5 0A 3A )                         // .?_....:
  .ver 11:0:0:0
}

.assembly extern Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UITest.Extension
{
  .publickeytoken = (B0 3F 5F 7F 11 D5 0A 3A )                         // .?_....:
  .ver 11:0:0:0
}

Since I didn't see some assemblies in the manifest, I removed them from the reference list, but the project won't even build.

Is there anything I misundersatnd about .NET CLR?

And here's another a related thread may be related: VS2012 failed to keep consistent DLL version in *.csproj file and assembly manifest, a VS2012 bug?

Update

In the above, I said I removed them from the reference list, but the project won't even build. This is not true.

I removed the DLL references not mentioned in the assembly manifest, the project still builds well. And these info are also removed from *.csproj file.

So I think we do can put some un-necessary refernces in the project, and these info will goes into the *.csproj file. But it will NOT go into the assembly manifest if the compiler consider the reference is un-necessary.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
You should cut the Update section andn paste as an answer. Then after one day you can accept your own answer and close the discussion. – Lex Li Aug 19 '12 at 3:07

Assembly or Project reference (ie "stored in the *.csproj" as Reference or ProjectReference) not actually used in code are not included in generated assembly. It's a standard behavior.

Some tools like Resharper can help you to remove them.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.