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I have a type hierarchy, and I'm not sure of a clean / good way to implement operator< and operator==.

Essentially, I already have this:

class Parent {
    public:
        virtual ~Parent() {}
};

class A : public Parent { int         data; };
class B : public Parent { double      data; };
class C : public Parent { std::string data; };

bool operator==(A const & lhs, A const & rhs) { return lhs.data == rhs.data; }
bool operator< (A const & lhs, A const & rhs) { return lhs.data <  rhs.data; }

bool operator==(B const & lhs, B const & rhs) { return lhs.data == rhs.data; }
bool operator< (B const & lhs, B const & rhs) { return lhs.data <  rhs.data; }

bool operator==(C const & lhs, C const & rhs) { return lhs.data == rhs.data; }
bool operator< (C const & lhs, C const & rhs) { return lhs.data <  rhs.data; }

What I'd like to implement as well, is this:

bool operator==(Parent const & lhs, Parent const & rhs) { ... }
bool operator< (Parent const & lhs, Parent const & rhs) { ... }

I've currently implemented it by doing:

bool operator==(Parent const & lhs, Parent const & rhs) {
    try {
        return dynamic_cast<A const &>(lhs) == dynamic_cast<A const &>(rhs);
    } catch(std::bad_cast const & e) {
    }

    try {
        return dynamic_cast<B const &>(lhs) == dynamic_cast<B const &>(rhs);
    } catch(std::bad_cast const & e) {
    }

    try {
        return dynamic_cast<C const &>(lhs) == dynamic_cast<C const &>(rhs);
    } catch(std::bad_cast const & e) {
    }

    assert(typeid(lhs) != typeid(rhs));
    return false;
}

But this just seems awful. Is there a cleaner way of going about this?

share|improve this question
    
Parent isn't an abstract class. Should it be? I'd also argue that your current approach is ugly on purpose. It is hard to think of a situation where something like that makes sense. –  pmr Aug 19 '12 at 3:08
    
@pmr: I'd like Parent to be a key in a std::map. That's the reason behind this. I'm open for other methods of going about this that are less ugly, but nothing has come to mind. –  Bill Lynch Aug 19 '12 at 3:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For comparisons of complex types, you may find Double Dispatch useful.

If your types are very simple, it is sometimes effective to roll them all into one. In the example of 3 unsigned variants, it would likely be better to just use one type to accommodate all sizes, and to avoid dynamic dispatch and more complicated graphs of types.


Applied to original question; where A, B, and C all used unsigned types:

well, one quick and dirty approach would be:

class Parent {
protected:
  virtual ~Parent() {}
public:
  bool operator<(const Parent& pOther) const {
    return this->as_uint64() < pOther.as_uint64();
  }
  // ...
private:
  // using a type which accommodates all values
  virtual uint64_t as_uint64() const = 0;
};

and then deriving from Parent would take the form:

class A : public Parent {
// ...
private:
    virtual uint64_t as_uint64() const { return this->data; }
private:
    uint16_t data;
};

then Parent could simply define all comparators, and all Parent types would be comparable.

share|improve this answer
    
The classes A, B, and C are more complicated then what I've presented them as. I could probably construct some std::string that I could do something like this with. But I was thinking there could be some other method to make this happen. –  Bill Lynch Aug 19 '12 at 3:20
1  
hmm - that detail should have probably been in the OP. anyways -- depending on the complexity of the type, you may need to resort to double dispatch: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_dispatch -- but that's cleaner than your solution in the OP. –  justin Aug 19 '12 at 3:25
    
Sorry about leaving out that detail. Tried to simplify the question to what seemed like the most important parts. –  Bill Lynch Aug 19 '12 at 3:39
1  
For now, I think I can do the uint64_t stuff for the classes I'm currently dealing with. The classes are going to get worse later, so I'll look into double dispatch at that point. Thanks! –  Bill Lynch Aug 19 '12 at 3:44
    
@sharth ok - will update the answer to include double dispatch article –  justin Aug 19 '12 at 3:45

Use a virtual comparator for single dispatch and dynamic_cast for type casting:

class ABC_base {
public:
    virtual ~ABC_base() {} 
    bool operator < (ABC_base const & rhs) const {
        return this->comparator(rhs) < 0;
    }
protected:
    virtual int comparator (ABC_base const &) = 0;
};

class ABC : public ABC_base {
protected:
    virtual int comparator(ABC_base const & rhs) const {
        try {
            return my_comparator(dynamic_cast<ABC const&>(rhs));
         // Run-time cast failed - use double dispatch as fallback
         } catch (std::bad_cast&) {
             return -rhs.comparator(*this);
         }
     }
private:
    int my_comparator(ABC const & rhs) const {
        if (data < rhs.data)
            return -1;
        if (data == rhs.data)
            return 0;
        if (data > rhs.data)
            return 1;
    }
    T data;
};

Here's how the code works:

The base class's operator < is called, which uses dynamic lookup to find the comparator. It checks the returned value to see if it's lesser.

The derived class's comparator attempts to downcast the base class reference so that comparison can be done on the derived class's members.

Why the base class reference, instead of using the derived class reference? Virtual dispatch would not work otherwise due to incorrect function signature.

Should the downcast succeed, it calls the non-virtual private comparator. Otherwise, it uses virtual dispatch again to do (rhs ? *this) and negates the result to compensate for the inverted ordering.

Why not have the cast and comparison in the one virtual function? It will make the code messier since the function will do two things: casting and comparing. Hence, there's a private comparator function. Should you want to use the base function in a derived class, along the lines of class ABC_der : public ABC, call ABC::comparator(static_cast<ABC const&>(rhs)). The use of Base:: forces static dispatch so you don't have to expose the helper comparison function.

Right now, this and rhs are of the same type, so we can finally do the actual comparison. A chain of if statements is used to return a value conformant to Java's Comparable and C's qsort() semantics.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, but I'm not able to follow your code here at all. –  Bill Lynch Aug 19 '12 at 3:41
    
@sharth: I've rewritten it to make it significantly simpler, and added a few paragraphs of explanation. –  moshbear Aug 19 '12 at 4:24
    
Doesn't allow a heterogeneous associative container with key shared_ptr<ABC_base> or similar. –  aschepler Aug 19 '12 at 6:48
    
@aschepler for heterogeneous comparisons via visitor pattern or double dispatch, the class will need to implement separate operators - truly heterogeneous comparisons are not going to work since you're doing general T1,T2 comparisons. Other than hashing, there's no general form for this. –  moshbear Aug 19 '12 at 8:19

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