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The following code compiles:

^{}();

And this compiles:

void (^x)();
(x = ^{})();

But this doesn't:

(void (^x)() = ^{})();

The error I get is Expected ')'. Is this a bug with llvm or something? It's totally holding me back from pretending Objective-C is JavaScript.

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2  
That's not so weird, since Objective-C isn't JavaScript –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Aug 19 '12 at 4:07
    
That was just a joke. In reality I'm like 90% sure they're not the same language. –  Anshu Chimala Aug 19 '12 at 5:57
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This wouldn't make sense in a C-like language. To see why, let's build the statement from the ground up.

First, we'll use your working declaration for x:

void (^x)();

Now let's initialize it in the same statement:

void (^x)() = ^{};

So far so good - x has been initialized with the correct block. So let's invoke x now. But where will the () go? Naturally, we need to place the () immediately after a block-valued expression. However, in C, declarations are statements, not expressions so

(void (^x)() = ^{})();

doesn't make sense. The only place the () can go is after the ^{}:

void (^x)() = ^{}();

But ^{}() has type void, not type void (^)().

To sum up: you can't declare a block variable and invoke it at the same time. you'll have to either declare and initialize the variable, and then call it

void (^x)() = ^{};
x();

or declare it and then assign and call it

void (^x)();
(x = ^{})();

or just separate all three:

void (^x)();
x = ^{};
x();

As a concluding thought, let's say it was desirable to declare and invoke blocks at the same time. If we decided to allow code like (void (^x)() = ^{})();, then for the sake of consistency, we would have to also allow code such as ++(void x = 4); or (void x = 1) + (void y = 2);. I hope you'll agree that these just look strange in C.

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Excellent explanation. +1 –  CodaFi Aug 19 '12 at 5:28
    
Ah, that makes sense. I think the weirdness of the block declaration syntax confused me a bit. It totally doesn't make sense to try to invoke the declaration. I wish the compiler could come up with something better than Expected ')' though :/ –  Anshu Chimala Aug 19 '12 at 6:00
    
@AnshuChimala: I agree. When I compile the code with Clang 3.0, I get two error: expected ')' errors. These are followed by error: expected expression (referring to applying () to the declaration). Only the last error message is important in this case, so the fact that it is listed last might even be a bug of sorts, considering Clang's focus on improving error messages. –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Aug 19 '12 at 6:22
    
Please file a bug via bugreporter.apple.com. The Clang team is both quite responsive and very much desires to improve the error messages in the compiler. –  bbum Aug 19 '12 at 18:08
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As an analogy, consider:

This compiles:

if (42) { }

And this compiles:

int x;
if (x = 42) { }

But this doesn't:

if (int x = 42) { }
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Nice - far more concise and to the point than my answer! –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Aug 19 '12 at 18:26
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