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Quick Question guys... Are these code spinets have the same alignment ?

struct sse_t {
     float sse_data[4];
};

// the array "cacheline" will be aligned to 64-byte boundary
struct sse_t alignas(64) cacheline[1000000];

Or

// every object of type sse_t will be aligned to 64-byte boundary
struct sse_t {
     float sse_data[4];
} __attribute((aligned(64)));

struct sse_t cacheline[1000000];
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Short answer, no. You seem to be changing two things between the snippets. What's the bigger problem you're trying to solve? –  Mysticial Aug 19 '12 at 4:48
1  
Sorry, there was a typo... I am trying do declare aligned array of sse_t objects. –  ARH Aug 19 '12 at 5:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Are these code spinets have the same alignment ?

Not quite. Your two examples are actually very different.

In your first example, you will get an array of sse_t objects. A sse_t object is only guaranteed 4-byte alignment. But since the entire array is aligned to 64-bytes, each sse_t object will be properly aligned for SSE access.

In your second example, you are forcing each sse_t object to be aligned to 64-bytes. But each sse_t object is only 16 bytes. So the array will be 4x larger. (You will have 48 bytes of padding at the end of each sse_t object).


struct objA {
     float sse_data[4];
};
struct objB {
     float sse_data[4];
} __attribute((aligned(64)));

int main(){
    cout << sizeof(objA) << endl;
    cout << sizeof(objB) << endl;
}

Output:

16
64

I'm pretty sure that the second case is not what you want.

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But why do you want to align to 64 bytes? http://ideone.com/JNEIBR

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct sse_t1 {
     float sse_data[4];
};

// the array "cacheline" will be aligned to 64-byte boundary
struct sse_t1 alignas(64) cacheline1[1000000];

// every object of type sse_t will be aligned to 64-byte boundary
struct sse_t2 {
     float sse_data[4];
} __attribute((aligned(64)));

struct sse_t2 cacheline2[1000000];

int main() {
    cout << "sizeof(sse_t1) = " << sizeof(sse_t1) << endl;
    cout << "sizeof(sse_t2) = " << sizeof(sse_t2) << endl;  

    cout << "array cacheline1 " << (((size_t)(cacheline1) % 64 == 0)?"aligned to 64":"not aligned to 64") << endl;
    cout << "array cacheline2 " << (((size_t)(cacheline2) % 64 == 0)?"aligned to 64":"not aligned to 64") << endl;    

    cout << "cacheline1[0] - cacheline1[1] = " << (size_t)&(cacheline1[1]) - (size_t)&(cacheline1[0]) << endl;
    cout << "cacheline2[0] - cacheline2[1] = " << (size_t)&(cacheline2[1]) - (size_t)&(cacheline2[0]) << endl;  

    return 0;
}

Output:

sizeof(sse_t1) = 16
sizeof(sse_t2) = 64
array cacheline1 aligned to 64
array cacheline2 aligned to 64
cacheline1[0] - cacheline1[1] = 16
cacheline2[0] - cacheline2[1] = 64
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