Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the traditional way to add event listener:

function getComboA(sel) {
    var value = sel.options[sel.selectedIndex].value;  
}

<select id="comboA" onchange="getComboA(this)">
<option value="">Select combo</option>
<option value="Value1">Text1</option>
<option value="Value2">Text2</option>
<option value="Value3">Text3</option>
</select>

But I wanted to adapt to the addEventListener way:

productLineSelect.addEventListener('change',getSelection(this),false);

function getSelection(sel){
    var value = sel.options[sel.selectedIndex].value;
    alert(value);
}

It doesn't work because I can't pass any parameter in getSelection() as the second parameter in addEventListener method? As far as I know I can only use the function name without parenthesises.

Any idea?

BTW, please look at my previous question about console.log doesn't work in safari 6.0 developer inspector, I can't write any output in the console, which is frustrating.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

No need to pass anything in. The function used for addEventListener will automatically have this bound to the current element. Simply use this in your function:

productLineSelect.addEventListener('change', getSelection, false);

function getSelection() {
    var value = this.options[this.selectedIndex].value;
    alert(value);
}

Here's the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/dJ4Wm/


If you want to pass arbitrary data to the function, wrap it in your own anonymous function call:

productLineSelect.addEventListener('change', function() {
    foo('bar');
}, false);

function foo(message) {
    alert(message);
}

Here's the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/t4Gun/


If you want to set the value of this manually, you can use the call method to call the function:

var self = this;
productLineSelect.addEventListener('change', function() {
    getSelection.call(self);
    // This'll set the `this` value inside of `getSelection` to `self`
}, false);

function getSelection() {
    var value = this.options[this.selectedIndex].value;
    alert(value);
}
share|improve this answer
    
great! perfect answer! Could you point out what kind of mechanism of javascript that pass a function name(I mean without parenthesises) to other function? this's really interesting to me –  mko Aug 19 '12 at 6:06

When you use addEventListener, this will be bound automatically. So if you want a reference to the element on which the event handler is installed, just use this from within your function:

productLineSelect.addEventListener('change',getSelection,false);

function getSelection(){
    var value = sel.options[this.selectedIndex].value;
    alert(value);
}

If you want to pass in some other argument from the context where you call addEventListener, you can use a closure, like this:

productLineSelect.addEventListener('change', function(){ 
    // pass in `this` (the element), and someOtherVar
    getSelection(this, someOtherVar); 
},false);

function getSelection(sel, someOtherVar){
    var value = sel.options[sel.selectedIndex].value;
    alert(value);
    alert(someOtherVar);
}
share|improve this answer

If the this value you want is the just the object that you bound the event handler to, then addEventListener() already does that for you. When you do this:

productLineSelect.addEventListener('change', getSelection, false);

the getSelection function will already be called with this set to the object that the event handler was bound to. It will also be passed an argument that represents the event object which has all sorts of object information about the event.

function getSelection(event) {
    // this will be set to the object that the event handler was bound to
    // event is all the detailed information about the event
}

If the desired this value is some other value than the object you bound the event handler to, you can just do this:

var self = this;
productLineSelect.addEventListener('change',function() {
    getSelection(self)
},false);

By way of explanation:

  1. You save away the value of this into a local variable in your other event handler.
  2. You then create an anonymous function to pass addEventListener.
  3. In that anonymous function, you call your actual function and pass it the saved value of this.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.