Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

To my astonishment, this compiles:

const char* c_str()
{
    static const char nullchar = '\0';
    return nullchar;
}

and it introduced a bug in my code. Thankfully, I caught it.

Is this intentional by C++, or a compiler bug? Is there a reason why the data type is actively ignored?
It worked in Visual C++ 2010 and GCC, but I don't understand why it should work, given the obvious data type mismatch. (The static isn't necessary, either.)

share|improve this question
    
Are you compiling according to C++03? –  oldrinb Aug 19 '12 at 6:42
1  
@ta.speot.is: I don't think it has anything to do with the CPU architecture... –  Mehrdad Aug 19 '12 at 6:47
2  
Certainly C++98 does have the notion of compile-time constant expressions. –  Managu Aug 19 '12 at 6:55
1  
@Mehrdad well constexpr is C++11-specific anyways... but the const variable is a constant expression by §5.19.1 of the C++03 standard... An integral constant-expression can involve only literals (2.13), enumerators, const variables or static data members of integral or enumeration types initialized with constant expressions (8.5), non-type template parameters of integral or enumeration types, and sizeof expressions. –  oldrinb Aug 19 '12 at 6:55
2  
@ta.speot.is "Maybe if the pointer is 64-bit?" Size is not an issue. –  curiousguy Aug 19 '12 at 7:04

8 Answers 8

up vote 67 down vote accepted

As you've defined it, nullchar is an integer constant expression with the value 0.

The C++03 standard defines an null pointer constant as: "A null pointer constant is an integral constant expression (5.19) rvalue of integer type that evaluates to zero." To make a long story short, your nullchar is a null pointer constant, meaning it can be implicitly converted and assigned to essentially any pointer.

Note that all those elements are required for that implicit conversion to work though. For example, if you had used '\1' instead of '\0', or if you had not specified the const qualifier for nullchar, you wouldn't get the implicit conversion -- your assignment would have failed.

Inclusion of this conversion is intentional but widely known as undesirable. 0 as a null pointer constant was inherited from C. I'm fairly sure Bjarne and most of the rest of the C++ standard committee (and most of the C++ community in general) would dearly love to remove this particular implicit conversion, but doing so would destroy compatibility with a lot of C code (probably close to all of it).

share|improve this answer
3  
It is probably worth adding that in C a const variable with value 0 does not quality as null-pointer constant, which means that the OP's code is not valid in C (and as such would not be "broken" by any changes, since it is broken already from C point of view). –  AndreyT Aug 19 '12 at 7:12
1  
@JerryCoffin: Er, but that only requires the equivalence of a literal zero to a null pointer, not an arbitrary constant expression. Why ignore the type after it's assigned to something that's explicitly typed as something completely unrelated? In other words, what's the point of substituting the entire expression, stripping the type, rather than just the value, with the correct type? That wouldn't break much sensible code, as far as I can tell... –  Mehrdad Aug 19 '12 at 7:20
1  
@Mehrdad: As-is, they depend on an implicit conversion from one int value (0) to pointer. To make it work in the other direction, you'd have to allow implicit conversion from any pointer to int -- which I'm pretty sure would be worse. –  Jerry Coffin Aug 19 '12 at 7:26
2  
So maybe like this: Why allow integer constant expressions to be implicitly converted to null pointers (instead of allowing only literals)? (Note that this is a hypothetical question). –  Managu Aug 19 '12 at 7:27
2  
@Mehrdad: There's no such conversion either in C or C++. In C++ it works through implicit conversion to bool. In C it works through implicit comparison to literal 0, i.e. if (p) is equivalent to if (p != 0). The latter also does't use conversion to int. –  AndreyT Aug 19 '12 at 7:28

This is an old history: it goes back to C.

There is no null keyword in C. A null pointer constant in C is either:

  • an integral constant expression with value 0, like 0, 0L, '\0' (remember that char is an integral type), (2-4/2)
  • such expression cast to void*, like (void*)0, (void*)0L, (void*)'\0', (void*)(2-4/2)

The NULL macro (not a keyword!) expands to such null pointer constant.

In the first C++ design, only the integral constant expression was allowed as a null pointer constant. Recently std::nullptr_t was added to C++.

In C++, but not in C, a const variable of integral type initialized with an integral constant expression is an integral constant expression:

const int c = 3;
int i;

switch(i) {
case c: // valid C++
// but invalid C!
}

So a const char initialized with the expression '\0' is a null pointer constant:

int zero() { return 0; }

void foo() {
    const char k0 = '\0',
               k1 = 1,
               c = zero();
    int *pi;

    pi = k0; // OK (constant expression, value 0)
    pi = k1; // error (value 1)
    pi = c; // error (not a constant expression)
}

And you think this is not sound language design?


Updated to include relevant parts of C99 standard... According to §6.6.6...

An integer constant expression shall have integer type and shall only have operands that are integer constants, enumeration constants, character constants, sizeof expressions whose results are integer constants, and floating constants that are the immediate operands of casts. Cast operators in an integer constant expression shall only convert arithmetic types to integer types, except as part of an operand to the sizeof operator.

Some clarifications for C++-only programmers:

  • C uses the term "constant" for what C++ programmers know as a "literal".
  • In C++, sizeof is always a compile time constant; but C has variable length arrays, so sizeof is sometimes not a compile time constant.

Then, we see §6.3.2.3.3 states...

An integer constant expression with the value 0, or such an expression cast to type void *, is called a null pointer constant. If a null pointer constant is converted to a pointer type, the resulting pointer, called a null pointer, is guaranteed to compare unequal to a pointer to any object or function.


To see just how old this functionality is, see the identical mirrored parts in the C98 standard...

§6.6.6

An integer constant expression shall have integer type and shall only have operands that are integer constants, enumeration constants, character constants, sizeof expressions whose results are integer constants, and floating constants that are the immediate operands of casts. Cast operators in an integer constant expression shall only convert arithmetic types to integer types, except as part of an operand to the sizeof operator.

§6.3.2.3.3

An integer constant expression with the value 0, or such an expression cast to type void *, is called a null pointer constant. If a null pointer constant is converted to a pointer type, the resulting pointer, called a null pointer, is guaranteed to compare unequal to a pointer to any object or function.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 great info, thanks. Regarding your question: No, I don't think it's sound language design, since it obviously introduced a needless bug in my code. :P –  Mehrdad Aug 19 '12 at 7:11

nullchar is a (compile-time-)constant expression, with value 0. So it's fair game for implicit conversion to a null pointer.

In more detail: I'm quoting from a 1996 draft standard here.

char is an integral type. nullchar is const, so it is a (compile-time) integral constant expression, as per section 5.19.1:

5.19 Constant expressions [expr.const]

1 In several places, C++ requires expressions that evaluate to an inte- gral or enumeration constant ... An integral constant-expression can involve ... const variables ...

Moreover, nullchar evaluates to 0, allowing it to be implicitly converted to a pointer, as per section 4.10.1:

4.10 Pointer conversions [conv.ptr]

1 An integral constant expression (expr.const) rvalue of integer type that evaluates to zero (called a null pointer constant) can be con- verted to a pointer type.

Perhaps an intuitive reason "why" this might be allowed (just off the top of my head) is that pointer width isn't specified, and so conversion from any size integral constant expression to a null pointer is allowed.


Updated with the relevant parts of the (newer) C++03 standard... According to §5.19.1...

An integral constant-expression can involve only literals (2.13), enumerators, const variables or static data members of integral or enumeration types initialized with constant expressions (8.5), non-type template parameters of integral or enumeration types, and sizeof expressions.

Then, we look to §4.10.1...

A null pointer constant is an integral constant expression (5.19) rvalue of integer type that evaluates to zero. A null pointer constant can be converted to a pointer type; the result is the null pointer value of that type and is distinguishable from every other value of pointer to object or pointer to function type. Two null pointer values of the same type shall compare equal.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, that's obviously what's happening, but (why) is it allowed by C++? That's the question. –  Mehrdad Aug 19 '12 at 6:35
1  
"Just a guess:" You guessed correctly. –  curiousguy Aug 19 '12 at 6:47
    
In GCC at least, the only time the compiler doesn't generate an error is when the value is 0. if you write static const char nullchar = '\x30' or any other value, compilation does fail. So Managu is right: 0 is a special case. If you want warnings in gcc, use -Wconversion on the command line, which warns on all conversions where you don't explicitly use a cast. Not sure about MSVC. –  Mr Lister Aug 19 '12 at 6:47
2  
I am very curious as well. I'm wondering if that is really allowed by the C++ standard, or a side effect of constant replacement done too early. –  sylvain.joyeux Aug 19 '12 at 6:50
    
@sylvain.joyeux try g++ -std=c98 -pedantic -W -Wall... you'll see it's a well-defined part of the standard :-) –  oldrinb Aug 19 '12 at 6:52

It compiles for the very same reason this compiles

const char *p = 0; // OK

const int i = 0;
double *q = i; // OK

const short s = 0;
long *r = s; // OK

Expressions on the right have type int and short, while the object being initialized is a pointer. Does this surprise you?

In C++ language (as well as in C) integral constant expressions (ICEs) with value 0 have special status (although ICEs are defined differently in C and C++). They qualify as null-pointer constants. When they are used in pointer contexts, they are implicitly converted to null pointers of the appropriate type.

Type char is an integral type, not much different from int in this context, so a const char object initialized by 0 is also a null-pointer constant in C++ (but not in C).

BTW, type bool in C++ is also an integral type, which means that a const bool object initialized by false is also a null-pointer constant

const bool b = false;
float *t = b; // OK
share|improve this answer
1  
"integral constant expressions (ICEs)" do not confuse with Internal Compiler Error ;) –  curiousguy Aug 19 '12 at 7:53
    
@curiousguy: I confused it with H₂O ;) –  Mehrdad Aug 19 '12 at 9:21

It is not ignoring the data type. It's not a bug. It's taking advantage of the const you put in there and seeing that its value is actually an integer 0 (char is an integer type).

Integer 0 is a valid (by definition) null pointer constant, which can be converted to a pointer type (becomes the null pointer).

The reasons why you'd want the null pointer is to have some pointer value which "points to nowhere" and can be checkable (i.e. you can compare a null pointer to an integer 0, and you will get true in return).

If you drop the const, you will get an error. If you put double in there (as with many other non integer types; I guess the exceptions are only types that can be converted to const char* [through overloading of the conversion operators]), you will get an error (even w/o the const). And so forth.

The whole thing is that, in this case, your implementation sees that you're returning a null ptr constant; which you can convert to a pointer type.

share|improve this answer

It seems that a lot of the real answer to this question has ended up in the comments. To summarize:

  • The C++ standard allows const variables of integral type to be considered "integral constant expressions." Why? Quite possibly to bypass the issue that C only allows macros and enums to hold the place of integral constant expression.

  • Going (at least) as far back as C89, an integral constant expression with value 0 is implicitly convertible to (any type of) null pointer. And this is used often in C code, where NULL is quite often #define'd as (void*)0.

  • Going back to K&R, the literal value 0 has been used to represent null pointers. This convention is used all over the place, with such code as:

    if ((ptr=malloc(...)) {...} else {/* error */}
    
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, if I recollect right, that's also for historic reasons; at some point so much code was already referring to (defined by literals) char strings as char *, that it was considered reasonable to allow the assignment in question, when const was introduced. May I even read this notice in the K&R itself, not sure. –  mlvljr Sep 12 '12 at 23:05

there is a auto cast. if you well run this program:

#include <stdio.h>
const char* c_str()
{
    static const char nullchar = '\0';
    return nullchar;
}

int main()
{
    printf("%d" , sizeof(c_str()));
    return 0;
}

the out-put well be 4 on my computer -> the size of a pointer.

the compiler auto casts. notice, at least gcc gives a warning (i don't know about VS)

share|improve this answer
1  
"there is a auto cast" there is no such thing as an "auto cast". Either it is an implicit conversion, or it's a cast (an explicit conversion). –  curiousguy Aug 19 '12 at 6:46

I think it might be the fact the null character is common between the types. What you are doing is setting a null pointer when you return the null character. This would fail if any other character was used because you are not passing the address of the character to the pointer, but the value of the character. Null is a valid pointer and character value so a null character can be set as pointer.

In short, null can be used by any type to set an empty value, regardless to if it is an array, a pointer, or a variable.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.