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From time-to-time I would like to manually set up an object. Some of my classes are fairly complex and may have 14 or more variables. Is there a tool in VS2010 or elsewhere that could take a class description and turn it into a constructed object?

I understand that this might not make sense so take the following simplified example as follows:

internal class MyObject
{
    internal string Description { get; set; }
    internal int Stock { get; set; }
    internal int DaysSinceLastCount { get; set; }
    internal double TotalValue { get; set; }
    internal bool IsUpToDate { get; set; }

    internal bool IsUnableToBeSet
    {
        get { return Stock==5; }
    }
}

now, typically, if I wanted to build this in a manual way to do the testing I would do something like this:

    MyObject myObject = new MyObject
        {
            Description = "my description",
            Stock = 7,
            DaysSinceLastCount = 10,
            TotalValue = 1000.10,
            IsUpToDate= true;
        };

my problem is, with large classes, I find myself spending a lot of time typing them up - is there an easier way? Is there some yet undiscovered function of Visual Studio that knows how to auto create an object. As I type "MyObject myObject = new ..." the intellisense doesn't seem to be too forthcoming. I'm considering copy-paste and then resex to help but thought I'd ask before heading down that road.

    EDIT: resex \{.*?\} and replace with =, to help build may be an option

There have been some SO topics where constructors need to be built but I'm not sure if too many do the above. Thanks for any help!

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do you need to setup some default values of all properties when object initialized? –  Kundan Singh Chouhan Aug 19 '12 at 7:02
    
Yes, when testing I need to build objects manually (or at least I think I do) - basically, I just need some dummy data in the form of objects to test some of my classes –  Sisyphus Aug 19 '12 at 13:40

3 Answers 3

So you need to test the classes with any random data..Why not use a constructor with a bool parameter..

internal class MyObject
    {
        internal string Description { get; set; }
        internal int Stock { get; set; }
        internal int DaysSinceLastCount { get; set; }
        internal double TotalValue { get; set; }
        internal bool IsUpToDate { get; set; }
        internal bool IsUnableToBeSet
        {
            get { return Stock==5; }
        }
        public MyObject(bool isTest)
        {
             if(isTest==true)
             {
            Description=this.GetHashCode().ToString();
            Stock=new Random().Next();
            DaysSinceLastCount=new Random().Next();
            TotalValue=new Random().Next();
            IsUpToDate=true;
         }
             else
             //do nothing
            }
    }
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Probably won't be random data but if I do need to do that I'll keep this in mind - thanks. –  Sisyphus Aug 19 '12 at 12:39

You could use a code snippet. However you'll have to write this manually once. For example, with the snippet below, I can create a new object by typing:

someobject [tab] [tab]

Put the snippet in for example

..\Documents\Visual Studio 2010\Code Snippets\Visual C#\My Code Snippets

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<CodeSnippets xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/2005/CodeSnippet">
  <CodeSnippet Format="1.0.0">
    <Header>
      <Title>
        New Object
      </Title>
      <Shortcut>someobject</Shortcut>
    </Header>
    <Snippet>
      <Declarations>
        <Literal>
          <ID>InstanceName</ID>
          <ToolTip>Name of the instance</ToolTip>
          <Default>myObject</Default>
          <Type>System.String</Type>
        </Literal>
        <Literal>
          <ID>Name</ID>
          <ToolTip>Name property</ToolTip>
          <Default>Name</Default>
          <Type>System.String</Type>
        </Literal>
        <Literal>
          <ID>Value</ID>
          <ToolTip>Value property</ToolTip>
          <Default>Value</Default>
          <Type>System.String</Type>
        </Literal>
      </Declarations>
      <Code Language="CSharp">
        <![CDATA[var $InstanceName$ = new MyObject
            {
                Name = "$Name$",
                Value = "$Value$"
            };]]>
      </Code>
    </Snippet>
  </CodeSnippet>
</CodeSnippets>
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you are correct - it would mean creating it once and if I'm going to do that for testing, I could copy-paste the original one that I made. Thanks for the reminder about creating snippets though - I'm sure it will come in handy. –  Sisyphus Aug 19 '12 at 12:42
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The only way I've figured to do this when you have LARGE classes is to copy the class and then find and replace the info inside curly braces \{.*?\} and replace with = , \n\r (in NotePad++) as mentioned in the comments. I then manually replace the internal string or internal int etc with nothing and fill in my values. It's not ideal or elegant but I've just resigned to the fact that there is no tool to do it.

It helps if I format my class like this:

    internal class MyObject
    {
      internal string Description { get; set; }
      internal int Stock { get; set; }
      internal int DaysSinceLastCount { get; set; }
      internal double TotalValue { get; set; }
      internal bool IsUpToDate { get; set; }
      internal bool IsUnableToBeSet    {        get { return Stock==5; }    }

     }

as this helps the regex pick up the last {} even though I have to delete it as there is no set .

Again, remember, this was designed to do this for LARGE classes - not the one above!
If anyone can think of a better way I'd be happy to re-assign the answer!

[EDIT] = pre-VS2012 you should use "{.@}" to do the search above. See this question

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