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I'm using a d3.js Streamgraph to show sales over time. Then I've got a transition to show profit over the same period. The data looks like this:

var data = [{
    "name": "apples",
    "sales": [{
        "x": 0,
        "y": 941
    }, {
        "x": 1,
        "y": 490
    }],
    "profit": [{
        "x": 0,
        "y": 6
    }, {
        "x": 1,
        "y": 3
    }]
}, {
    "name": "oranges",
    "sales": [{
        "x": 0,
        "y": 344
    }, {
        "x": 1,
        "y": 425
    }],
    "profit": [{
        "x": 0,
        "y": 3
    }, {
        "x": 1,
        "y": 2
    }]
}];

It works, but I'm currently generating the stacked data in a somewhat ham-fisted way, applying stack.values twice:

var stack_sales = d3.layout.stack()
    .offset("wiggle")
    .values(function(d) { return d.sales; });

var stack_profit = d3.layout.stack()
    .offset("wiggle")
    .values(function(d) { return d.profit; });

stack_sales(data);
stack_profit(data);

I've been getting into JavaScript Patterns but can't see the DRY way to do this. Can you help?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One option is to define the values function dynamically:

var stack = d3.layout.stack().offset("wiggle");
["sales", "profit"].forEach(function(metric) {
  stack.values(function(d) { return d[metric]; })(data);
});

Another option would be to transpose your data so that the metrics are on the outside and the series are on the inside:

var metrics = [
  {
    "name": "sales",
    "series": [
      {
        "name": "apples",
        "values": [
          {"x": 0, "y": 941}, 
          {"x": 1, "y": 490}
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "oranges",
        "values": [
          {"x": 0, "y": 344}, 
          {"x": 1, "y": 425}
        ]
      }
    ]
  }, {
    "name": "profits",
    "series": [
      {
        "name": "apples",
        "values": [
          {"x": 0, "y": 0}, 
          {"x": 1, "y": 6}
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "oranges",
        "values": [
          {"x": 0, "y": 1}, 
          {"x": 1, "y": 3}
        ]
      }
    ]
  }
];

Then you can access the values statically:

var stack = d3.layout.stack()
    .offset("wiggle")
    .values(function(d) { return d.values; });

metrics.forEach(function(metric) {
  stack(metric.series);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect. Much appreciated! –  Derek Hill Aug 20 '12 at 11:18
    
@mbostock, could you lend some insight on why we need to transpose the data in the first place (that is, why d3.layout.stack() works like it does)? It seems like the things being stacked are the data points that belong to the original categories. Why the need for the intermediate step? Speed? –  Sam Selikoff Apr 25 '13 at 20:56
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