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Problem #3 on Project Euler is:

The prime factors of 13195 are 5, 7, 13 and 29.

What is the largest prime factor of the number 600851475143?

My solution takes forever. I think I got the right implementation; however, when testing with the big number, I have not being able to see the results. It runs forever. I wonder if there's something wrong with my algorithm:

public class LargestPrimeFactor3 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        long start, end, totalTime;
        long num = 600851475143L;
        long pFactor = 0;

        start = System.currentTimeMillis();

        for(int i = 2; i < num; i++) {
            if(isPrime(i)) {                
                if(num % i == 0) {
                    pFactor = i;                        
                }
            }
        }

        end = System.currentTimeMillis();
        totalTime = end - start;
        System.out.println(pFactor + " Time: "+totalTime);
    }

    static boolean isPrime(long n) {

        for(int i = 2; i < n; i++) {
            if(n % i == 0) {
                return false;
            }
        }        
        return true;
    }     
}
share|improve this question
3  
I'd start by optimizing your isPrime loop a little. Just iterate until i > sqrt(n). –  Blender Aug 19 '12 at 9:02
2  
To add to Blender, you can also just check if n % 2 == true before the for loop.. and start the for loop with i = 3 and iterate by 2 (i+=2). A sieve would be even quicker. –  Inisheer Aug 19 '12 at 9:04
3  
And if you're using Java, you can also use nextProbablePrime() from BigInteger class instead of for(int i = 2; i < num; i++) in your main method. –  fardjad Aug 19 '12 at 9:05
    
If you really want to make it run fast, try C/C++. It ran in less than a second for me and w/o the optimizations suggested below. –  MartyE Aug 19 '12 at 10:32
1  
As a side note, project euler is about optimization, not just brute force. there are many questions which aren't solvable in any amount of time using the "simple" solution (in any language). you need to figure out what the logical "short cuts" are. Also, BigInteger/BigDecimal are slow. I used the Apfloat library as a replacement. (i solved about ~50 problems before i moved on). –  jtahlborn Aug 20 '12 at 22:17

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Although not in Java, I think you can probably make out the following. Basically, cutting down on the iterations by only testing odd divisors and up to the square root of a number is needed. Here is a brute force approach that gives an instant result in C#.

static bool OddIsPrime (long oddvalue)  // test an odd >= 3 
{
    // Only test odd divisors.
    for (long i = 3; i <= Math.Sqrt(oddvalue); i += 2)
    {
        if (value % i == 0)
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    long max = 600851475143;   // an odd value
    long maxFactor = 0;

    // Only test odd divisors of MAX. Limit search to Square Root of MAX.
    for (long i = 3; i <= Math.Sqrt(max); i += 2)
    {
        if (max % i == 0)
        {
            if (OddIsPrime(i))  // i is odd
            {
                maxFactor = i;
            }
        }
    }
    Console.WriteLine(maxFactor.ToString());
    Console.ReadLine();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Also, I think the compiler may be recalculating Math.Sqrt(value) each time. I may be best speed-wise to have this as a class variable that gets set once the number is known. and the loop in isPrime can go to for (long i=3; i<limit; i+=2) –  MartyE Aug 19 '12 at 10:30
1  
wow... math.sqrt() really makes the difference, but I don't see why. Anyone care to argument why? Thanks –  miatech Aug 19 '12 at 18:16
1  
@miatech Only going to the sqrt of a number greatly decreases the # of divisors to test. ie. if you were to test 1000001, instead of testing 1000001 divisors, you only test 1000. And if you only test those up to 1000 that are odd, then that cuts it down by another half. So you go from testing 1000001 values to testing 500. –  Inisheer Aug 19 '12 at 19:47
    
Your IsPrime function incorrectly reports that 2 isn't a prime number. –  Blastfurnace Aug 19 '12 at 23:48
1  
@Blastfurnace Yes, I left it out because I knew I wouldn't be testing to see if 2 is prime while solving the problem. Micro optimization. –  Inisheer Aug 20 '12 at 0:23
public HashSet<Integer> distinctPrimeFactors(int n) //insane fast prime factor generator
{
    HashSet<Integer> factors = new HashSet<Integer>();
    int lastres = n;
    if (n==1)
    {
        factors.add(1);
        return factors;
    }
    while (true)
    {
        if (lastres==1)
            break;
        int c = 2;
        while (true)
        {
            if (lastres%c==0)
                break;
            c++;
        }
        factors.add(c);
        lastres/=c;
    }
    return factors;
}

If you want to generate distinct prime factors for a number quickly use this method which makes the number smaller on each iteration. You can change int to long and it should work for you.

share|improve this answer

You should divide out each factor as it is found. Then there is no need to test them for primality, when we enumerate the possible divisors in ascending order (any thus found divisor can't be compound, its factors will be divided out already). Your code then becomes:

class LargestPrimeFactor4 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        long start, end, totalTime;
        long num = 600851475143L;   // odd value is not divided by any even
        long pFactor = 1L;

        start = System.currentTimeMillis();

        for(long i = 3L; i <= num / i; ) 
        {
            if( num % i == 0 ) {
                pFactor = i;
                num = num / i;
            }
            else {
                i += 2;
            }
        }
        if( pFactor < num ) { pFactor = num; }

        end = System.currentTimeMillis();
        totalTime = end - start;
        System.out.println( pFactor + " Time: " + totalTime);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
sorry, made a mistake analyzing your code, it's good. Too much wine ;-) –  stefan Aug 20 '12 at 22:52
    
@stefan good times! :) :) I'm conflicted about removing it. It' such a basic stuff... It's not a homework... –  Will Ness Aug 20 '12 at 22:53
    
yeah, don't drink and code –  stefan Aug 20 '12 at 22:54
    
one point of the deleted comment still applies: the check for if (pFactor < i) is not necessary since it only can be a previously checked i or 1. So remove that branch and you're even better ;-) –  stefan Aug 20 '12 at 23:00
    
@stefan was thinking about duplicates... –  Will Ness Aug 20 '12 at 23:07

Two things to improve performance:

static boolean isPrime(long n)
{
    for(int i = 2; i <= sqrt(n); i++)  // if n = a * b, then either a or b must be <= sqrt(n).
    {
        if(n % i == 0)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }        
    return true;
}  

now for the main loop

for(int i = num; i > 1; i--) // your interested in the biggest, so search from high to low until you have a match
{
    if(num % i == 0 && isPrime(i)) // check for num % i == 0 is faster, so do this first
    {
        pFactor = i;
        break; // break if you have a factor, since you've searched from the top
    }
}

There are still things one can improve here, but that's for you to find out. Think of modifying num. Have fun with project Euler :)

share|improve this answer
    
to search from high is no improvement here: the biggest prime factor of 600851475143 is 6857. Much closer to 1. :) Plus, we don't need any primality checks here. Check out my answer. –  Will Ness Aug 20 '12 at 22:34
    
going from the top IS better than the algorithm of OP since 6856 numbers do not need to be checked. Obviously there are even better ways, hence I suggested modifying num. I was trying to hint at a prime factor decomposition, which is way better (then obviously from low to high). ProjectEuler.net is about exploring new ideas by oneself, so hints are better –  stefan Aug 20 '12 at 22:45
    
6856 / 600851475143 = 1.1410473775350726e-8. That's one millionth of one percent an improvement. Come on! :) Ahh, I see your point about hints and PE.... –  Will Ness Aug 20 '12 at 22:51
    
PE taught me to do every little piece of optimization. Of course it's better to develop the idea of prime factorization to solve this problem, but it's also good to take small steps and learning about how far you can go with the current approach. And you're right: Staying with the same approach is a bad idea, even reversing the search yields merely nothing. –  stefan Aug 20 '12 at 22:57

Here's pseudocode for integer factorization by trial division:

define factors(n)

    z = 2

    while (z * z <= n)

        if (n % z == 0)
            output z
            n /= z

        else
            z++

    output n

The easiest way to understand this is by an example. Consider the factorization of n = 13195. Initially z = 2, but dividing 13195 by 2 leaves a remainder of 1, so the else clause sets z = 3 and we loop. Now n is not divisible by 3, or by 4, but when z = 5 the remainder when dividing 13195 by 5 is zero, so output 5 and divide 13195 by 5 so n = 2639 and z = 5 is unchanged. Now the new n = 2639 is not divisible by 5 or 6, but is divisible by 7, so output 7 and set n = 2639 / 7 = 377. Now we continue with z = 7, and that leaves a remainder, as does division by 8, and 9, and 10, and 11, and 12, but 377 / 13 = 29 with no remainder, so output 13 and set n = 29. At this point z = 13, and z * z = 169, which is larger than 29, so 29 is prime and is the final factor of 13195, so output 29. The complete factorization is 5 * 7 * 13 * 29 = 13195.

There are better algorithms for factoring integers using trial division, and even more powerful algorithms for factoring integers that use techniques other than trial division, but the algorithm shown above will get you started, and is sufficient for Project Euler #3. When you're ready for more, look here.

share|improve this answer

You could just prime factorize the number and then the largest prime factor would be the answer:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;

public class PrimeFactorization {

    /* returns true if parameter n is a prime number, 
         false if composite or neither */
    public static boolean isPrime(long n) {
        if (n < 2) return false;
        else if (n == 2) return true;
        for (int i = 2; i < Math.pow(n, 0.5) + 1; i++)
            if (n % i == 0)
                return false;
        return true;
    }

    /* returns smallest factor of parameter n */
    public static long findSmallestFactor(long n) {
        int factor = 2; // start at lowest possible factor
        while (n % factor != 0) { // go until factor is a factor
            factor++; // test the next factor
        }
        return factor;
    }

    /* reduces the parameter n into a product of only prime numbers
       and returns a list of those prime number factors */
    public static ArrayList<Long> primeFactorization(long n) {

        ArrayList<Long> primes = new ArrayList<Long>();
          // list of prime factors in the prime factorization
        long largestFactor = n / findSmallestFactor(n);    

        long i = 2;
        while (i <= largestFactor) { 
          // for all possible prime factors 
          // (2 - largest factor of the number being reduced)

            if (isPrime(i) && n % i == 0) { 
                // if this value is prime and the number is divisible by it

                primes.add(i); // add that prime factor to the list
                n /= i; // divide out that prime factor from the number 
                        // to start reducing the new number
                largestFactor /= i; // divide out that prime factor 
                       // from the largest factor to get the largest 
                       // factor of the new number
                i = 2; // reset the prime factor test
            } else {
                i++; // increment the factor test
            }
        }

        primes.add(n); // add the last prime number that could not be factored
        Collections.sort(primes);
        return primes;
    }
}

And then call it like this:

ArrayList<Long> primes = PrimeFactorization.primeFactorization(600851475143L);
System.out.println(primes.get(primes.size() - 1));

The entire thing takes only a few milliseconds.

share|improve this answer
    
how many milliseconds does 600851475149 take? –  Will Ness May 11 '14 at 9:44
    
you might try posting this code to CodeReview and see what suggestions for improvement you might get there... :) –  Will Ness May 11 '14 at 10:13
    
@WillNess It took 55 seconds because of the findSmallestFactor iterating 600851475147 times lol. If that one method gets improved then this will be a really good algorithm for prime factorization. Thanks, and I will post there to get some feedback. –  mike yaworski May 11 '14 at 14:14
    
you could also compare your code with my answer here and compare their execution times. --- and no, there are some more problems with your code. :) –  Will Ness May 11 '14 at 14:34
    
@WillNess Yes. I'll have to see why dividing out by i works. –  mike yaworski May 11 '14 at 14:52
public class LargestPrimeFactor {
    static boolean isPrime(long n){
        for(long i=2;i<=n/2;i++){
            if(n%i==0){
                return false;                                               
            }
        }
        return true;    
    }

    static long LargestPrimeFact(long n){
        long largestPrime=0;
        for(long i=2;i<Math.sqrt(n)/2;i++){
            if(n%i==0){
                if(isPrime(i)){
                    largestPrime=i;
                }
                }                                       
            }
        return largestPrime;
    }
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        System.out.println (LargestPrimeFact(600851475143L));
    }
}

Source: http://crispylogs.com/project-euler-problem-3-solution/

share|improve this answer
    
unfortunately this answer is incorrect. For 6, 23, 25, 600851475149 it will return 0. –  Will Ness May 11 '14 at 10:23
    
@mikeyaworski no, not the only reason. /2 is totally wrong, and < is wrong too. After that, it's just a very inefficient algorithm. –  Will Ness May 11 '14 at 16:23

This one works perfectly!!

public class Puzzle3 {
public static void main(String ar[])
{
    Long i=new Long("1");
    Long p=new Long("600851475143");
    Long f=new Long("1");
    while(p>=i)
    {
        if(p%i==0)
        {
            f=i;
            p=p/i;
            int x=1;
            i=(long)x;
        }
        i=i+2;
    }
    System.out.println(f);
}

}

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, you could provide some context or guide to help author understand your solution. –  Eel Lee Aug 11 '14 at 13:16
    
what is going on here –  EpicPandaForce Aug 11 '14 at 13:31
    

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