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This question already has an answer here:

On compiling given program in GCC Compiler :

int main()  
{  
      int a=2,b=3;  
      (a>1)?b=10:b=50;  
      printf("%d",b);  
      return 0;     
}


it is showing error that "lvalue required as left operand"
but if i write 4th line as

(a>1)?b=10:(b=50);

Then its showing no compilation error . Can any one explain me why ?
And also how does it differ from if...else... ?

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marked as duplicate by Kay, Mogsdad, azurefrog, Paul92, Riley Avron Jan 5 at 19:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
It's being parsed as: ((a>1)?b=10:b) = 50; – Mysticial Aug 19 '12 at 9:53
1  
b = a > 1 ? 10 : 50; – Tedil Aug 19 '12 at 9:56
up vote 5 down vote accepted

As mentioned in the comments, you have an issue with operator precedence. Your code is interpreted as follows:

((a > 1) ? b = 10 : b) = 50;

The above code is invalid for the same reason that writing (b = 10) = 50 is invalid.

The code can be more clearly written as:

b = a > 1 ? 10 : 50;

And also how does it differ from if...else... ?

The conditional operator works only with expressions as operands. An if statement can contain statements in the body.

A conditional operator can always be replaced by an equivalent if statement. But the reverse is not true - there are if statements that cannot be replaced with an equivalent conditional operator expression.

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The issue you encounter is operator precedence. The = operator has lower precedence than the ?: operator.

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Do you mean "The = operator has LOWER precedence than ?:". Because first the ?: is executed, then the assignment. – poitroae Aug 19 '12 at 9:54
    
@Michael thanks, fixed. – ouah Aug 19 '12 at 9:55

I think your code should be:

int main()  
{  
      int a=2,b=3; 

      b=(a>1)?10:50; 

      printf("%d",b);  
      return 0;     
}

Cheers.

share|improve this answer
    
**b looks like a second-order pointer – huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 19 '12 at 9:58
    
Well sorry I didn't pay atention to other mistakes. It should actually be as it is right now, and sorry for the **, I thought they would turn bold inner characters. – Azurlake Aug 19 '12 at 10:02

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