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#include<stdio.h>
int* check(int,int);

int main()
{
    int *c,t = 2;
    c = check(10,20);
    printf("t = %d\n",t);
    printf("c = %d\n",*c);

    return 0;

}

int* check(int i,int j)
{
    int *p,*q;

    p = &i;
    q = &j;

    if(i>=45)
       return (p);
    else
       return (q);
}

I'm getting the output of code as :

t = 2
c = 2

why? because according to the concept the value returned to c is j address i.e. value of *c is 20 but as there is a printf statement preceding to the c's printf statement, therefore, the value of the *c should have been some garbage value as stack is changed.

can anyone help me at this ? Please Help !!

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Just guessing here, but maybe the printf calls inside libc use registers for their arguments and don't mess up the stack? Try compiling your file with gcc -S to get assembly code and see what happens. –  Torp Aug 19 '12 at 11:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is the case of Dangling Pointer. Referencing Dangling pointers is Undefined when may give any unpredictable value.

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This is quite dangerous coding

int *p,*q;

    p = &i;
    q = &j;

i & j both values are on stack, and as soon as check routine is over they will be removed from the memory.

Do it in other way by passing an lvalue rather than an rvalue (As you want a pointer in return)

#include<stdio.h>
    int* check(int*,int*);

    int main()
    {
        int *c,t = 2;int dummy=30;
        c = check(&t,&dummy);
        printf("t = %d\n",t);
        printf("c = %d\n",*c);

        return 0;

    }

    int* check(int *i,int *j)
    {

        if(*i>=45)
           return (i);
        else
           return (j);
    }
share|improve this answer

Edit: on my gcc C gets clobbered :) So you were just lucky. Just don't do this in production :)
Actually gcc -O3 exhibits the no stack change behavior, and gcc changes the stack. So "undefined behavior".

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