Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ok so I wanted to do this question :"Write a program to print a histogram of the lengths of words in its input"(Exercise 1-13 of the book C programming by Brian and dennis ritchie). In this code I am printing only the tally of various word lengths(as its my first attempt).

This program compiles fine but while running the code I am getting this Segmentation fault(code dump) error. What's wrong with this code?

#include<stdio.h>
void read(char input[]);
void draw(int i[]);
main()
{
    int i,k,l;
    int len[16];
    char input[100];
    read(input);
    i=k=l=0;
    for(l=0;l<=15;l++)
    {
        len[l]=0;
    }
    while(input[i]!='/0')
    {   
        if(input[i]!='\n'&&input[i]!='\t'&&input[i]!=' ')
        {   k++;
            i++;
        }
        else
        {   len[k]=len[k]+1;
            k=0;
            i++;    
        }
    }
    draw(len);
    return 0;
}

void read(char c[])
{
    int i=0;
    int a;
    while((a=getchar())!=EOF)
    {   c[i]=a;
        i++;
    }
    c[i]='\0';
}

void draw(int len[])
{   int i=0;
    printf("Length\tWords\n");
    for(i=1;i<=15;i++)
    printf("%6d\t%6d\n",i,len[i]);
}
share|improve this question
    
You might want to use the debugger and at least give us more information on the error code :o –  xQuare Aug 19 '12 at 11:56
    
@Papergay Sorry I'm a bit new with c, how would I do that? I'm just working on linux terminal. –  Vicky Aug 19 '12 at 12:03
    
Do a Google search for e.g. "gdb tutorial". –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 19 '12 at 12:04
    
Unrelated to your problem, but you might want to avoid using the name read for your own function. There is already a function with that name in the system. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 19 '12 at 12:07
    
Take this! And this. And this, this, this and thiiiiis. –  xQuare Aug 19 '12 at 12:15

4 Answers 4

for(l=0;l<=15;l++)
{
    len[l]=0;
}

Your array is of typeint [15] so you are accessing an element outside the array.

You have the exact same issue in the draw function here:

for(i=1;i<=15;i++)

Also:

char a;
while((a=getchar())!=EOF)

a should be of type int and not char. See this for the explanation:

http://c-faq.com/stdio/getcharc.html

share|improve this answer
    
You are right, just changed the code to int[16] but still the problem is there. –  Vicky Aug 19 '12 at 12:02
    
@Vicky also see the second part of the answer –  ouah Aug 19 '12 at 12:03
    
Did all you said, still the same error. Thanks anyways I'll try debugging –  Vicky Aug 19 '12 at 12:14

one error i could notice is in for(l=0;l<=15;l++). it should be for(l=0;l<15;l++).

int len[15] means len is int array of size 15 with valid locations as len[0], len[1], ... len[14] but here you are accessing len[15] which is undefined and may cause segmentation fault.

share|improve this answer
    
Changed the code to int[16] –  Vicky Aug 19 '12 at 12:20

This line contains an error:

while(input[i]!='/0')

and causes your code to access memory not owned by your program.

It should be:

while(input[i]!='\0')

as the string terminating char is '\0'.

share|improve this answer
    
Man you are gold. Sorry didn't see your comment before. I mean its working now, cheers. –  Vicky Aug 19 '12 at 12:54

In the function read, you do not check the length of the input, so if your input is larger than the number of entries in c you will write in memory not belonging to you.

Edit:

After you checked in a debugger it's easier to search for the reason of the error, and if you look at that while loop you will see it quite clearly:

while(input[i]!='/0')

You compare a character in input against an illegal character literal. You are using forward slash, but it should be a backward slash: '\0'. Actually, your should give a warning about a multi-character character literal.

share|improve this answer
    
But I am only typing around 4 words at runtime so that should be fine, no? –  Vicky Aug 19 '12 at 12:17
    
@Vicky As long as it's less than 99 characters in those words. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 19 '12 at 12:39
    
@Vicky Updated my answer with the (now) obvious answer. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 19 '12 at 12:56
    
Thanks yeah it did give that warning. Whats the difference between '\0' and '/0' –  Vicky Aug 19 '12 at 13:01
    
@Vicky '\0' is a single character, the so-called NULL-terminator and is used to terminate strings (as you apparently know already). '/0' are two different characters, and in a character literal is not really legal. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 19 '12 at 13:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.