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I am creating a program where I have objects called "hierarchies", which is little more than a list of lists with strings (ArrayList<ArrayList<String>>) with appropriate getters.

The user should be able to select the representation/formatting of these hierarchies - e.g. whether the hierarchy [1,2,3,4] should be represented as {1,2,3,4} or (1-4) or whatever, before it is written to a file.

Is there a clever/standard way to do this kind of separation of data and formatting? I am thinking of creating a "FormattedHierarchy"-object which merely consists of a Hierarchy-object and a Formatting-object, but I don't know if this is a good design choice or not.

Thanks for any pointers/tips/answers.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The worst thing you can do is coupling your hierarchy data representation with formatting. The hierarchy class should not know anything about formatting. My advice is to create a separate interface HierarchyFormatter with several different implementations.

I think code is worth thousand words:

public interface HierarchyFormatter {
    String format(Hierarchy hierarchy);
}

public class BraceFormatter implements HierarchyFormatter {
    public String format(Hierarchy hierarchy) {
        //...
    }
}

public class RangeFormatter implements HierarchyFormatter {
    public String format(Hierarchy hierarchy) {
        //...
    }
}

This is called a strategy design pattern. If some code needs to format your hierarchy, just pass an instance of HierarchyFormatter - any instance.

If you want to permanently bind hierarchy with some formatting, make your formatter stateful:

public abstract class HierarchyFormatter {
    protected final Hierarchy hierarchy;

    public HierarchyFormatter(Hierarchy hierarchy) {
        this.hierarchy = hierarchy;
    }

    public abstract String format();
}

public class BraceFormatter extends HierarchyFormatter {
    public String format() {
        //...
    }
}

public class RangeFormatter extends HierarchyFormatter {
    public String format() {
        //...
    }
}

Every time you create a formatter, you encapsulate the hierarchy class inside it.

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"The worst thing you can do is coupling your hierarchy data representation with formatting. The hierarchy class should not know anything about formatting." - As I suspected, but did not know how to do this. But how do I connect the different formattings with the hierarchies? Up to me or what? I'll probably use a map if that is not a bad idea. Accepting this tentatively, someone will have to come up with something a lot better for this to change. Thanks ! –  The Unfun Cat Aug 19 '12 at 13:15
    
@TheUnfunCat: obviously the formatter needs to know about hierarchy data, but not the other way around. I updated my answer to give you a hint how can you permanently bind some formatter with given hierarchy instance. Also you can use a simple ma from hierarchy -> formatter. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Aug 19 '12 at 13:22

You can approach it as a Model-View pattern. Your model is the one containing the actual data: ArrayList<ArrayList<String>> and the view is the one doing the formatting, presenting the data in various ways. and that is the Formatting class.

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You could add methods similar to the standard toString() methods, e.g. toArrayString() to format the object as {1,2,3,4} or toIntervalString() to format it as (1-4) ...

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