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Im porting a prototype plugin to jQuery.

The plugin uses the proscribed method of collecting all the plugins methods in an object literal and then calling them like [object].[method]

What I dont understand is, in any of those methods there is use of properties (defined at the begging of the script i.e. var x = 0, var y = 0, etc) that appear to be global and not passed as arguments or properties of a specific method.

How would I do this in jQuery and is it possible?

Please refer to 'var1' in the code below. Where would this be set so that all methods have access to it?

Example:

;(function($){

    var methods = {
        init : function(options) {

            var config = {
            // default options...
            }

            // overide config
            var settings = $.extend(config, options);

            return this.each(function() {
                        // init code goes here...
            });
        },

        function1 : function() {
            function2();
        },

        function2 : function() {
                $(selector).css({
                  width : var1,
                });             
        },
    }

    $.fn.[PLUGINNAME] = function(method) {

      if ( methods[method] ) {
        return methods[method].apply( this, Array.prototype.slice.call( arguments, 1 ));
      } else if ( typeof method === 'object' || ! method ) {
        return methods.init.apply( this, arguments );
      } else {
        $.error( 'Method ' +  method + ' does not exist on jQuery.tooltip' );
      } 

    };

})(jQuery);
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to declare the variable inside the self-evoking function, but outside any other function.

(function($){
    // This variable will be available to all methods, 
    // but not outside the plugin
    var var1,
        methods = {
            init : function(options) {
                ...
            }
            ...
        };
})(jQuery);

You could then use the init method to set the proper value to it for instance, if it is part of the initialization process, and not just a static variable.

Since JavaScript uses functions to declare variable scope, the outer self-evoking function will make sure that the variable don't "leak" up to the global scope, but since it is declare outside any of the inner functions, it will be available to all functions within your plugin.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Christofer, is this acceptable practice though or just a work around? In other words, would you do this? –  Alex Aug 19 '12 at 13:29
    
@Alex Yes, I would do this! The key thing here I believe is to make sure that you don't pollute the global namespace, which you avoid with this approach. –  Christofer Eliasson Aug 19 '12 at 13:31
    
Your a good man Christophofer, thanks for your help, answered. –  Alex Aug 19 '12 at 13:32
    
@Alex Just glad I could help! –  Christofer Eliasson Aug 19 '12 at 13:33

If you define it inside the topmost function before everything else, it will be accessible by all other methods:

(function($){
    var var1 = "some value";

    var methods = {
        init : function(options) {

            var config = {
            // default options...
            }

            // overide config
            var settings = $.extend(config, options);

            return this.each(function() {
                        // init code goes here...
            });
        },

        function1 : function() {
            function2();
        },

        function2 : function() {
                $(selector).css({
                  width : var1,
                });             
        },
    }

    $.fn.slideshow = function(method) {

      if ( methods[method] ) {
        return methods[method].apply( this, Array.prototype.slice.call( arguments, 1 ));
      } else if ( typeof method === 'object' || ! method ) {
        return methods.init.apply( this, arguments );
      } else {
        $.error( 'Method ' +  method + ' does not exist on jQuery.tooltip' );
      } 

    };

})(jQuery);
share|improve this answer
    
Of course, global variables should be used judiciously, but if you want to create a global variable accessible by all functions within this scope, then this would be the way to do it. You essentially hide var1 from anything outside of the scope of the anonymous function and expose it to everything inside. –  mhusaini Aug 19 '12 at 13:34

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