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ive seen functions passing pointers in their parameters and they are common in dynamic use executing different functions after afew steps. However i came across this representation in a header file:

void *allocate_mem(u_int32_t n);

Any clue to how it is to be used? Is the function a pointer or does it return a pointer?

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Please use cdecl.org whenever you have questions like this... entering void *allocate_mem(u_int32_t), we get declare allocate_mem as function (u_int32_t) returning pointer to void –  oldrinb Aug 19 '12 at 14:35
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Also, I suggest you see §6.3.2.3.1 of the C99 standard... A pointer to void may be converted to or from a pointer to any incomplete or object type. A pointer to any incomplete or object type may be converted to a pointer to void and back again; the result shall compare equal to the original pointer. –  oldrinb Aug 19 '12 at 14:38
    
See also malloc –  Paul R Aug 19 '12 at 15:00
    
cdecl.org => "face palm myself" –  ryantata Aug 19 '12 at 15:10
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

See my comments.

Please use cdecl.org whenever you have questions like this... entering void *allocate_mem(u_int32_t), we get the following.

declare allocate_mem as function (u_int32_t) returning pointer to void.

So, we know allocate_mem returns void *. Now, you're probably wondering why you would ever want a pointer to void...

§6.3.2.3.1 of the C99 standard states as follows.

A pointer to void may be converted to or from a pointer to any incomplete or object type. A pointer to any incomplete or object type may be converted to a pointer to void and back again; the result shall compare equal to the original pointer.

Thus you can convert the result of allocate_mem to fit your needs, e.g.

float *data = allocate_mem(1024 * sizeof(float))
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+1 for quoting the C99 standard. Man, how so I miss working in C/C++ :( –  verisimilitude Aug 19 '12 at 15:01
    
This is really awesome.. thanks :) the cdecl.org also help a ton!!! –  ryantata Aug 19 '12 at 15:12
    
+1, just a little nitpick for your vocabulary in the second last line: what you describe here is an (implicit) conversion and not a cast. A cast in C jargon is an "explicit conversion". –  Jens Gustedt Aug 19 '12 at 15:22
    
@JensGustedt right, right. :-p –  oldrinb Aug 19 '12 at 15:36
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The function returns a pointer to the new memory allocated.

The return type is a void*, the reason being that the function doesn't know what you want to use it for.

If you want to use it as an array of integers, you would cast it to an int*

eg.

int *p = allocate_mem(4*10);

The argument is the size (bytes) of memory that needs to be allocated. Therefore, allocating 40 bytes for 4-byte integers makes an array of ten 4-byte integers.

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don't cast the return of allocation functions. void* converts to any object pointer type all by itself. –  Jens Gustedt Aug 19 '12 at 15:23
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A void * is a pointer to something. What it points to is not known, but the idea is for it to work as sort of a neutral pointer. A void* param can take any kind of pointer type. However great care needs to be taken while handling these pointers as they come with their own set of limitations. You cannot dereference a void* it has to be cast to a valid type. The same goes with applying pointer arithmetic.

Refer this discussion for more details - C - pointers in functions and void variable type?

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