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I'm trying to get the number of difference between two pictures. When I compare 2 images in gray scale, pixDiff <> 0 but when it come to RGB, pixDiff is always 0.

I used openCV's compare and also a custom loop.

Mat frame, oldFrame;
cap >> oldFrame;

if(analyseMod == MONOCHROME)
    cvtColor(oldFrame, oldFrame, CV_BGR2GRAY);

nbChannels = oldFrame.channels();

while(1)
{
    pixDiff = 0;
    cap >> frame;

    //Test diff
    Mat diff;
    compare(oldFrame, frame, diff, CMP_NE);
    imshow("video 0", diff);
    imshow("video 1", frame);

    if(analyseMod == MONOCHROME)
    {
        cvtColor(frame, frame, CV_BGR2GRAY);

        for(int i=0; i<frame.rows; i++)
            for(int j=0; j<frame.cols; j++)
                if(frame.at<uchar>(i,j) < oldFrame.at<uchar>(i,j) - similarPixelTolerance || frame.at<uchar>(i,j) > oldFrame.at<uchar>(i,j) + similarPixelTolerance)
                    pixDiff++;
    }
    else if(analyseMod == RGB)
    {
        uint8_t *f = (uint8_t *)frame.data;
        uint8_t *o = (uint8_t *)oldFrame.data;

        for(int i=0; i<frame.rows; i++)
        {
            for(int j=0; j<frame.cols; j++)
            {
                if(f[nbChannels*i*frame.cols + j + RED] < o[nbChannels*i*oldFrame.cols + j + RED])
                    pixDiff++;
            }
        }
    }          

    frame.copyTo(oldFrame);

    cout << pixDiff;
    if(waitKey(30) >= 0) break;
}

Thx for help

share|improve this question
    
What is the meaning of RED, and why you have if with only one comparison for RGB case instead of two comparisons for monochrome case? –  Mikhail Aug 19 '12 at 16:42
    
RED = 2, I was only comparing the RED channel as test purpose. –  Naster Aug 19 '12 at 16:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I still don't get it, why are you not using your delta in the RGB case, but here is the solution for both cases, if you want to consider color channels separately. Set CN to 1 for monochrome case and to 3 for RGB case.

const int CN = 3; // 3 for RGB, 1 for monochrome

uint8_t *f = frame.ptr<uint8_t>();
uint8_t *o = oldFrame.ptr<uint8_t>();

for(int i = 0; i < frame.rows; ++i)
{
  for(int j = 0; j < frame.cols; ++j)
  {
    for (int c = 0; c < CN; ++c)
    {
      if (abs(*f - *o) > similarPixelTolerance) ++pxDiff;
      ++f, ++o;
    }
  }
}

It is way more efficient to access pixels in this way than to call at for each pixel. The only possible problem is if you have some padding in your images, but by default OpenCV is using continuous allocation.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx a lot, I will try this ;) –  Naster Aug 19 '12 at 17:06
    
Very nice code and hell fast thx! –  Naster Aug 19 '12 at 17:18

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