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I am new to Android Application Development and a new member at stackoverflow. I am currently trying to design a recipe application. I have decided upon the features of the app and the scope it will cover. The scope is very vast for me in terms of covering all the recipes from all over the world. I am to deal with a lot of data in this process.

I am currently trying to figure a good and efficient way of handling the data in my app. So far, as per what I have read in different forums, I believe that I have two options in terms of a database choice : 1) SQLite 2) Database on remote server (MySql/Postgre)

Following are some of the thoughts that have been going on in my mind when it comes to taking a decision between the two :

1) SQLite : This could be a good option but would be slow as it would need to access the file system. I could eliminate the slowness by performing DB data fetch tasks in the AsyncTask. But then there could be a limitation of the storage on different phones. Also I believe using SQLite would be easier as compared to using a remote DB.

2) Remote Database : The issue that I can see here is the slowness with multiple DB requests coming at the same time. Can I use threads here in some way to queue multiple requests and handle them one by one ? Is there an efficient way to do this.

Also I have one more question in terms of the formatting of my data once I pull it out from the above DB's. Is there a way I could preserve the formatting of my data ?

I would be more than thankful if someone could share their knowledgeable and expert comments on the above scenario. Also this is not a homework for me and I am not looking for any ready made code solutions. I am just looking for hints/suggestions that would help me clear my thoughts and help me take a decision. I have been looking for this for sometime now but was not able to find concrete information. I hope I will get some good advice here from the experienced people who might have encountered similar situation.

Thanks for reading this long post.

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

What about combining both approaches?

  • A local SQLite database that has the least recently used receipes so you don't need network all the time. Network is way slower than accessing the filesystem.

  • Some remote database accessed via some HTTP interface where you can read / write the whole database. And if you want users to be able to add receipes for other users to see you'll need an external database anyways.

SQLite : This could be a good option but would be slow as it would need to access the file system.

Accessing a local database is pretty fast, 5ms or so if it's just a simple read only query on a small database.

But then there could be a limitation of the storage on different phones

Depends on your definition of huge database. It is okay if it is only 2MB which would be enough to store lots of text-only receipes.

Also I believe using SQLite would be easier as compared to using a remote DB.

Yes, Android has a nice built-in SQLite API but no remote database API. And you don't need to setup a database server & interface.

The issue that I can see here is the slowness with multiple DB requests coming at the same time.

A decent database server can handle thousands of requests. Depends on your server hardware & software. http://dba.stackexchange.com/ should have more info on that. Required performance depends on how much users you have / expect.

I'd suggest a simple REST interface to your database since it's pretty lightweight but does not expose your database directly to the web. There are tons of tutorials and books about creating such interfaces to databases. There are even hosted database services like nextDb that do most of the work for you.

Is there a way I could preserve the formatting of my data ?

You could store HTML formatted data in your database and display it in a WebView or a TextView (via Html#fromHtml()) - both can display formatted text.

Databases don't care what type of text you store, for transfer over the internets you may need to encode the text so it does not interfere with the transport formatting (XML, JSON, ...).

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Thank you Zapl for such a detailed response. It has really helped me clear my thoughts. I have an account at DREAMHost wherein I have MySql database. I plan to use that as my remote DB. I am not sure whether I will have the freedom to configure my remote DB. One stupid question that I have is that whether the incoming request handling should be done at the DB side or in my web service ? – Abhishek Sabbarwal Aug 19 '12 at 18:18
    
The number of incoming requests will depend upon the number of users who will actually download and use the app on a regular basis. I expect this number to be a big one. I will look into dba.stackexchange.com and also try to figure out how I can efficiently handle the incoming requests. – Abhishek Sabbarwal Aug 19 '12 at 18:19
    
@AndroidNewbie AFAIK is the request scheduling done on the database side. But I've never setup a DB server just used it and don't really know the details. – zapl Aug 19 '12 at 18:28
    
Thank you for your response... I will dig in deep here. – Abhishek Sabbarwal Aug 19 '12 at 19:11

A simple way is to integrate Parse into your app. They have a nice framework that easily integrates into iOS and Android. Their plan is freemium, so you'll be able to use up to 1 million API request for no charge, and then its 7 cents for every request after that.

You'll have 1gb to store all your data sets / images, etc.

I don't use parse for everything, but I HIGHLY recommended it for large data schemes because they do all the scaling for you. Check out the API, I think it would be worth your time.

I just started to work on a few of my own projects, and I'm using Parse again. I have to say it's improved a lot over the last 6-8 months. Especially with the Twitter and Facebook integration.

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I will check this out. – Abhishek Sabbarwal Sep 27 '12 at 16:32

The key issue here is the size of the data - any significant database of recipes would be too large to store on the phone imho,thus you seem stuck with the remote database solution.

As opposed to trying access the remote database from android I suggest you use a a go between web application that will process requests from the application and return JSON objects that you need.

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Thanks Elemental!! I have previously used the JSON way of doing things in one of the applications. Could you comment a bit on how I could handle the formatting of my data after I extract it from the DB ? Also any ideas how could I implement the web application efficiently ? Sorry to bug you with so many questions!! – Abhishek Sabbarwal Aug 19 '12 at 17:05

It totally depends on your software requirements. If you need to deal with a small amount of data then you may choose SQLite, but for a huge amount to data better use a remote DB.

SQLite: It works fine with little amount of data & I experienced it response time is good.

Remote DB: I think you may use small server side app to submit the data to your client app. It will solve/reduce your thread related issues/complexities.

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