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In and external JS file I have

$(document).ready(function() {
    var example = function(){ alert("hello") }
});

and I want to call that function from my html, how would I do that?

<img src="..." ondblclick="example()" />

n.b. I'm aware of jquery dblclick() but curious about how to correctly do the above.

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6 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted
$(document).ready(function() {
    window.example = function() {
        alert("hello")
    }
});

Or define it outside, if possible. It doesn't look like it has to be defined inside document ready at all.

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-1 for not spewing hatred at globals –  Raynos Aug 20 '12 at 8:39
    
@Raynos I think it's the global state that's evil :P –  Esailija Aug 20 '12 at 9:19
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The best option would be to simply define the function outside document.ready(). There is no reason defining the function within the $(document).ready() event is necessary, as if you call the function within the $(document).ready() function, the document is guarenteed to be ready.

However, you can also define the function on the global window object, like so:

$(document).ready(function() {
    window.example = function(){ alert("hello") }
});
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I believe there is something wrong, using the var inside doc.ready shouldn't create a global jsfiddle.net/KxGXP –  ajax333221 Aug 19 '12 at 17:34
    
@ajax333221 - Oh gosh, I copied his code but forgot to edit it. Thanks for catching that! –  jeff Aug 19 '12 at 17:41
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The other solutions here will work, but structurally in your project, the best solution is to remove the event handling code from the HTML and hook up the event entirely via javascript (separate the HTML/JS). Since you already have jQuery in your project, this is very easy. To do that, all you need to do is to put some sort of identification on the image:

<img id="example" src="..." />

Then, in you can just hook up the event code in your ready() function like this

$(document).ready(function() {
    $("#example").dblclick(function() {
        alert("Hello");
    });
});

This has the following advantages:

  1. It creates no global variables - reducing the global namespace pollution.
  2. It separates the HTML from the javascript which keeps all code governing the behavior in one compact spot and is usually a good thing
  3. Using event listeners is a bit more scalable than using .ondblclick - allowing multiple different parts of code to use non-conflicting event handlers on the same object
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Your function should be global (in fact, property of window object) if you want to access it from HTML. But best practice is to avoid global variables and functions, using namespace instead:

// let's publish our namespace to window object
if (!window.myNamespace){
    // creating an empty global object
    var myNamespace = {};
}

// and add our function to it
$(document).ready(function() {
    myNamespace.example = function(){ alert("hello"); }
});

We can use it in HTML like this:

<img src="..." ondblclick="myNamespace.example()" />
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You can either move the function declaration outside of the DOM-ready handler:

function example(){ alert("hello") }

$(document).ready(function() {
    // code
});

But the better solution is to keep JavaScript in your .js files and avoid the inline event handlers. Give your element an id and fetch it:

<img src="..." id="imgid" />

$(document).ready(function() {
    document.getElementById("imgid").ondblclick = function(){ alert("hello") }
});
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@Esailija has answered it correctly but if you want to keep it as it is then simply remove var and make it global.

var example;
$(document).ready(function() {
  example = function() {
    alert("hello")
  }
});

If you do not put var the variable/function/object becomes global. Using var you were setting its context within document.ready function.

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2  
"Global" is the same as "property of window". In other words, your answer is identical to Esailija's. –  Fyodor Soikin Aug 19 '12 at 16:42
    
@Fyodor Soikin: Yeah, I knew it but I just tried to explain the use of var. –  codef0rmer Aug 19 '12 at 16:51
2  
Always use var if you declare a variable. Not using it and making a global variable is a hack. Your code won't pass strict mode. –  Florian Margaine Aug 19 '12 at 17:01
    
Thats correct. I should have defined the variable above ready-call. –  codef0rmer Aug 19 '12 at 18:17
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