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Hi could somebody give me an understandable example of a requirejs singleton with underscore's once()?

I have this as far:

define(['jquery', 'underscore', 'backbone'], function($, _, Backbone) {

    var SingletonModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
        urlRoot: "/model",
        idAttribute: "_id"
    });

    return function() {
        once(SingeletonModel);
    };

});

As you see especially the return statement is totally crap. I just have no idea how to singletony a Backbone.Model...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm doing this

define(['jquery', 'underscore', 'backbone'], function($, _, Backbone) {

    var SingletonModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
        urlRoot: "/model",
        idAttribute: "_id"
    });

    if (SingletonModel.prototype._instance){
        return SingletonModel.prototype._instance;
    }
    SingletonModel.prototype._instance = new SingletonModel;
    return SingletonModel.prototype._instance;

});

then you just require this file and use it as it would be an instance.

EDIT: Haven't tried it, but the usage of once() should be in your case

underscore.once()
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If you want an AMD compatible singleton, you can just use the following:

define(
    [...],
    function() {
        var MyModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
            //...
        });

        return new MyModel();
    }
);

Because of the way that require.js works, you should only get one instance of MyModel.

From what I understand, _.once(someFunction) generates a function that can only be called once, because its return value is stored and so every time the function is called after the first time, its original return value will be returned.

For the singleton case, however, what you're using with _.once(MyModel) returns a constructor which always returns the same object (as far as I can tell). We can test it: http://jsfiddle.net/gfarrell/Z3CNc/

As you can see in that fiddle, if you return this; at the end of your constructor it will be fine. Try removing return this; and then use the console output to inspect the second instance, you'll see that it has no properties of the first.

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