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I have a csv file arranged as follows:

Person,Date1,Date2,Status
Person1,12/10/11,17/10/11,Done
...

I want to perform various operations on it and I'm starting by pulling it into Python and converting the date strings to datetime.datetime objects. I have the following code:

import re
import numpy as np
from datetime import datetime, timedelta
from dateutil import rrule

def get_data(csv_file = '/home/garry/Desktop/complaints/input.csv'):
    inp = np.genfromtxt(csv_file,
        delimiter=',',
        filling_values = None,
        dtype = None)

    date = re.compile(r'\d+/\d+/\d+')
    count = 0
    item_count = 0

    for line in inp:
        for item in line:
            if re.match(date, item):
                item = datetime.strptime(item, '%d/%m/%y')
                inp[count][item_count] = item
                item_count += 1
            else:
                item_count += 1
        item_count = 0
        count += 1

    return inp

def get_teams(data):
    team_list = []
    for line in data:
        if line[0] not in team_list:
            team_list.append(line[0])
        else:
            pass
    del team_list[0]
    return team_list

def get_months():
    month_list = []
    months = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12]
    now = datetime.now()
    start_month = now.month - 7
    for count in range(0,7):
        if months[start_month] > now.month:
            year = now.year - 1
        else:
            year = now.year
        month_list.append([months[start_month], year])
        start_month += 1
    return month_list

if __name__ == "__main__":
    inp = get_data()
    for item in inp[2]:
        print type(item)
    team_list = get_teams(inp)
    month_list = get_months()

The print statement in the main method (inserted for debugging) returns:

<type 'numpy.string_'>
<type 'numpy.string_'>
<type 'numpy.string_'>
<type 'numpy.string_'>

which is obviously not what I'm hoping for, since the loop in the get_data() function is supposed to change the date strings to datetime.datetime objects. When I run the same code as is in the loop on individual date strings as a test they convert the Type just fine. In the code above they are also working in one sense because the strings do change to the datetime.datetime format - they just aren't the right Type. Can anyone see what I'm doing wrong here?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that the inp array you define in get_data gets a "|S8 dtype from np.genfromtxt. If you try to replace one of its elements by another object, the object is transformed into a string.

A first idea would be to transform inp into a list, with inp.tolist(). That way, you can change the type of each individual field as you see fit. But there's better (I think):

According to your example, the second and third columns are always dates, right ? Then, you could convert the strings to datetime objects straight away with np.genfromtxt

np.genfromtxt(csv_file,
              delimiter=",",
              dtype=None,
              names=True,
              converters={1:lambda d:datetime.strptime(d,"%d/%m/%y"),
                          2:lambda d:datetime.strptime(d,"%d/%m/%y")})

The names=True means that you'll get a structured ndarray as output, with the fields taken from the very first non-commented line (here, your Person,Date1,Date2,Status). The converters keyword, as you guessed it, will convert the strings from the 2nd and 3rd column to datetime objects.

Note that if you already know that your first and last column are strings, you may want to use another dtype than None: np.genfromtxt works faster if it doesn't have to guess the types of each column.

Now, for another comment:

  • instead of keeping a counter in your for loop, use something like for (i, item) in enumerate(whatever), it's simpler.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's exactly what I needed. –  Garry Cairns Aug 19 '12 at 19:02
    
Let me stress again that unless you have absolutely no idea about the structure of your data, you shouldn't use dtype=None in np.genfromtxt. Here, you should use dtype=("|S8",object,object,"|S8") (or whatever the size of your strings). –  Pierre GM Aug 19 '12 at 20:36
    
Thanks Pierre, already taken on board in my script's next iteration. –  Garry Cairns Aug 19 '12 at 21:05

The problem is that the type of numpy arrays is fixed. Numpy stores data in a fixed-size contiguous block of memory, so when you assign a value to an index in a numpy array, numpy converts it before storing it in the array. It does this even with arrays of strings. For example:

>>> a = numpy.array(['xxxxxxxxxx'] * 10)
>>> for index, datum in enumerate(a):
...     print datum, a[index], type(a[index])
...     a[index] = 5
...     print datum, a[index], type(a[index])
... 
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'numpy.string_'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'numpy.string_'>

Conveniently (or not!) datetime.datetime objects can be converted using str, so in this line...

inp[count][item_count] = item

...numpy simply converts the item to a string and inserts that into the array.

Now, you could skirt this behavior by using dtype=object. But doing so negates much of the speed of numpy, because you're forcing numpy to call a bunch of slow python code.

>>> a = numpy.array(['xxxxxxxxxx'] * 10, dtype=object)
>>> for index, datum in enumerate(a):
...     print datum, a[index], type(a[index])
...     a[index] = 5
...     print datum, a[index], type(a[index])
... 
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'str'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'int'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'str'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'int'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'str'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'int'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'str'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'int'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'str'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'int'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'str'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'int'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'str'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'int'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'str'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'int'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'str'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'int'>
xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx <type 'str'>
xxxxxxxxxx 5 <type 'int'>

I'll add that you're not using numpy to its full potential here. Numpy is designed to work on arrays in a vectorized way, without explicit for loops. (See the tutorial for more on that.) So whenever you use a for loop to work with numpy, it's natural to ask how you might avoid doing so. Rather than pointing out the problems with your code, I'll show you one interesting thing you can do:

>>> numpy.genfromtxt('input.csv', delimiter=',', dtype=None, names=True)
array([('Person1', '12/10/11', '17/10/11', 'Done'),
       ('Person1', '12/10/11', '17/10/11', 'Done'),
       ('Person1', '12/10/11', '17/10/11', 'Done'),
       ('Person1', '12/10/11', '17/10/11', 'Done'),
       ('Person1', '12/10/11', '17/10/11', 'Done'),
       ('Person1', '12/10/11', '17/10/11', 'Done')], 
      dtype=[('Person', '|S7'), ('Date1', '|S8'), 
             ('Date2', '|S8'), ('Status', '|S4')])
>>> a = numpy.genfromtxt('input.csv', delimiter=',', dtype=None, names=True)
>>> a['Status']
array(['Done', 'Done', 'Done', 'Done', 'Done', 'Done'], 
      dtype='|S4')
>>> a['Date1']
array(['12/10/11', '12/10/11', '12/10/11', '12/10/11', '12/10/11',
       '12/10/11'], 
      dtype='|S8')

Now instead of looping over the table with a regular expression, you can simply access the dates directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking the time and effort to answer so thoroughly. I've accepted Pierre GM's answer as closer to what I needed but this was extremely helpful and I'm putting time aside tomorrow to understand it more fully. Upvoted. –  Garry Cairns Aug 19 '12 at 19:01

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