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I was looking for recursive solution for evaluating expression in Polish prefix notation, didn't find, but i found pseudo code for that and I wanted to translate it to the C++ but it is hard. I wrote BIG LETTERS where I don't know how to do it. Please correct me I am java guy and for me C++ is big mess, but can't help it.

int preEval(stack<string> stos){
  string el = "";
  if(stos.empty()){
    return 0;
  }else if(stos.top() IS VALUE){
    string el = stos.top();
    stos.pop();
    return atoi(el.c_str());
  }else if(stos.top() IS OPERATOR){
    int x = preEval(stos);
    int y = preEval(stos);
    return x OPERATOR y;
  }
  return 0;
}

EDIT

When I have expression like / 10 5 Should stack suppose to have elements(from top) / 10 5, or 5 10 / ? Just asking because if I want it in / 10 5 I have to read string somehow backwards.

share|improve this question
    
Link us to the original pseudocode you found, and perhaps a description of exactly what you're trying to achieve? –  WendiKidd Aug 19 '12 at 18:38
1  
Before getting into what the CAPITALS need to be replaced with, there's a bug: when processing an operator, you need to call stos.pop() before recursing, otherwise you'll have an infinite loop. –  j_random_hacker Aug 19 '12 at 18:46
    
BTW, I think the case of stos.empty() must be an error, otherwise * 1 would parse successfully. –  Vlad Aug 19 '12 at 18:50
    
strtol can be used to see if a string is an integer. –  Vaughn Cato Aug 19 '12 at 18:53
    
Well, the stack is perhaps not the appropriate structure. I would use a list instead. Indeed, in / 10 5 you should see / first, 10 next and 5 last, which is more natural with list. –  Vlad Aug 20 '12 at 15:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you have functions like these:

#include <assert.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <stack>
#include <string>

using std::stack;
using std::string;
using std::cerr;

enum Operator {
  operator_none,
  operator_plus,
  operator_minus
};

Operator tokenOperator(const string &token)
{
  if (token=="+") return operator_plus;
  if (token=="-") return operator_minus;
  return operator_none;
}

int applyOperator(Operator op,int x,int y)
{
  switch (op) {
    case operator_plus:  return x+y;
    case operator_minus: return x-y;
    case operator_none:
      break;
  }
  assert(false);
  return 0;
}

bool isValue(const string &token,int &output_value)
{
  char *end = 0;
  errno=0;
  output_value = strtol(token.c_str(),&end,10);
  if (errno!=0) return false;
  return *end=='\0';
}

bool isOperator(const string &token,Operator &output_operator)
{
  output_operator = tokenOperator(token);
  return output_operator!=operator_none;
}

Then preEval can be implemented like this:

int preEval(stack<string> &stos)
{
  if (stos.empty()) return 0;

  string el = stos.top();
  stos.pop();

  int value = 0;
  Operator op = operator_none;

  if (isValue(el,value)) return value;

  if (isOperator(el,op)) {
    int x = preEval(stos);
    int y = preEval(stos);
    return applyOperator(op,x,y);
  }

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
When I have expression like / 10 5 Should stack suppose to have elements(from top) / 10 5, or 5 10 / ? Just asking because if I want it in / 10 5 I have to read string somehow backwards. –  Yoda Aug 20 '12 at 15:58
    
Awesome, thank you. –  Yoda Aug 20 '12 at 16:52

I think, a better solution would be to split the work into 2 stages: lexing and parsing.

At the lexing stage, you classify each token to see whether it's an operator (+, -, etc.) or a constant, or maybe a variable. Then you pack the parsed entity into a structure containing the type and additional information.

At the parse stage, which is presented by your code, you work not with strings, but with structures. Looking at the structure, you can easily find out its type. (It can be either a field inside the structure or a structure's type if you choose to build a hierarchy of structures derived from a common base.)

Actually, the logic should be the same in both Java and C++.

share|improve this answer
#include <string>
#include <map>

using namespace std;

bool is_value(string s) {
    return s.find_first_not_of("0123456789") == string::npos;
}

int do_add(int x, int y) {
    return x + y;
}

int do_subtract(int x, int y) {
    return x - y;
}

// etc.

typedef int (*binary_op)(int, int);   // Give this function pointer type a nice name
map<string, binary_op> ops;

// Somewhere before the preEval() is ever called
ops["+"] = do_add;
ops["-"] = do_subtract;    // etc.

binary_op lookup_op(string s) {
    map<string, binary_op>::const_iterator it = ops.find(s);
    if (it != ops.end()) {
        return *it;
    } else {
        return NULL;
    }
}

Now, instead of separately testing whether the token is an operator and later performing that operator, use a single function call to get a pointer to the operator function that needs to be called (if the token is an operator) or NULL otherwise. I.e.:

}else if(stos.top() IS OPERATOR){
    int x = preEval(stos);
    int y = preEval(stos);
    return x OPERATOR y;
}

becomes

} else {
    binary_op op = lookup_op(stos.top());
    if (binary_op != NULL) {
        stos.pop();   // This fixes the bug I mentioned in my top comment
        int x = preEval(stos);
        int y = preEval(stos);
        return op(x, y);
    } else {
        syntax_error();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
IMHO lookup_op could be just return ops[s]; –  Vlad Aug 19 '12 at 19:28
    
@Vlad: That would work, but it will create a new entry in the map every time a non-operator string is looked up. –  j_random_hacker Aug 19 '12 at 22:55
1  
Well, that's true. Pity that map::operator[] is defined in such a way. Anyway, the erroneous output is expected to happen rarely, so I would sacrifice some efficiency for gaining more clarity. (Standard argument about idiomatic code and answer about premature optimizations should follow.) –  Vlad Aug 19 '12 at 23:17
    
When I have expression like / 10 5 Should stack suppose to have elements(from top) / 10 5, or 5 10 / ? Just asking because if I want it in / 10 5 I have to read string somehow backwards. –  Yoda Aug 20 '12 at 13:06
1  
@RobertKilar: One of those 2 ways couldn't possibly work, could it? Just read each token and push it onto the stack. If the string is "5 10 /", the last token, which will appear on the top of the stack, will be "/" which is what we need. Also, upvote answers if you find them useful. –  j_random_hacker Aug 20 '12 at 14:35

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