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I have three radio buttons. The code behind their change events is as follows:

    private void uxRajRadioButton_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e) 
    {
        if (uxRajRadioButton.Checked == true)
        {
            uxPersonBettingLabel.Text = "Raj";
            GuySelected = 0;
            uxBetNumericUpDown.Maximum =  Guys[GuySelected].Cash;
        }
    }
    private void uxPaulRadioButton_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e) 
    {
        if (uxPaulRadioButton.Checked == true) 
        {
            uxPersonBettingLabel.Text = "Paul";
            GuySelected = 1;
            uxBetNumericUpDown.Maximum = Guys[GuySelected].Cash;
        }
    }
    private void uxMikeRadioButton_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e) 
    {
        if (uxMikeRadioButton.Checked == true)
        {
            uxPersonBettingLabel.Text = "Mike";
            GuySelected = 2;
            uxBetNumericUpDown.Maximum = Guys[GuySelected].Cash;
        }
    }

With just three radio buttons this is acceptable but if I had say 7 radio buttons each with 20 lines of code behind its change event then it would be a lot of (needless?) code. I've attempted to shorten the above and ended up with the following. Is this correct?

     private void uxRajRadioButton_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e) 
    { 
         radioButtonCode(this.uxRajRadioButton, 0);
     }
    private void uxPaulRadioButton_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e) 
    {
        radioButtonCode(this.uxPaulRadioButton,1);
    }
    private void uxMikeRadioButton_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e) 
    {
        radioButtonCode(this.uxMikeRadioButton, 2);
    }

    int GuySelected=0;
    public void radioButtonCode(RadioButton myRadio, int mybettorIndex)
    {
        if (myRadio.Checked == true)
        {
            GuySelected = mybettorIndex;
            uxPersonBettingLabel.Text = Guys[GuySelected].Name;
            uxBetNumericUpDown.Maximum = Guys[GuySelected].Cash;
        }
    }
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Could you have the same event handler for all the radio buttons? Something like

private void uxRadioButton_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{ 
     radioButtonCode((RadioButton)sender);
}

public void radioButtonCode(RadioButton myRadio)
{
    if (myRadio.Checked == true)
    {
        int guySelected = getGuySelectedIndex(myRadio);
        uxPersonBettingLabel.Text = Guys[guySelected].Name;
        uxBetNumericUpDown.Maximum = Guys[guySelected].Cash;
    }
}

public int getGuySelectedIndex(RadioButton myRadio)
{
    int index = 0;
    if (myRadio == this.uxRajRadioButton) index = 0;
    else if (myRadio == this.uxPaulRadioButton) index = 1;
    else if (myRadio == this.uxMikeRadioButton) index = 2;
    return index;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 ok - very nice - never quite understood the "sender" parameter. so I could then just add this event procedure uxRadioButton_CheckedChanged to each of the change events in the properties window in VS - nice. –  whytheq Aug 19 '12 at 19:10
    
not quite working ... it doesn't like the following radioButtonCode(sender); and I understand why as sender is an object but the method radioButtonCode parameter is a RadioButton. How do I resolve this? –  whytheq Aug 21 '12 at 7:53
    
Oops, missed the cast, glad you got it. I like @VoidStar's answer in that he combined the uxRadioButton_CheckedChanged and radioButtonCode functions together, there's no real reason to have them separate IMO. –  zackdever Aug 21 '12 at 15:31

Your second code sample, where you have extracted the commonalities out to a function looks like the way I would have done this refactoring.

It is about as good as you can make it, barring the name (UpdateUserInfo might be slightly better).

share|improve this answer
    
thanks Oded - there are a few other ways of skinning the cat in amongst the answers, but if you are relatively happy with my code then I'll pretty much leave it as is. –  whytheq Aug 19 '12 at 19:09
    
@whytheq - I am not the be all and end all of answers... Take a look at the other options, and if you like the skinning method better, go with it ;) –  Oded Aug 19 '12 at 19:10
    
I'm trying to use zever's amswer below - can you see the comment I've added - how do I get his code to work? if I change the method parameter to type object then I get other errors?! –  whytheq Aug 21 '12 at 7:54
    
@whytheq - try to cast the sender: radioButtonCode((RadioButton)sender);. –  Oded Aug 21 '12 at 8:14
    
will do. I'd tried sending an object and then in the method creating a new variable myRad and having RadioButton myRad = (RadioButton)myRadio;. This ran but had some unexpected results. I'll follow your advice and cast in the CheckedChanged method. –  whytheq Aug 21 '12 at 8:17

There is a better way. Declare an array of radio buttons and bind them to above event at run time. This binding code won't be inside designer page. This will result in single ArrayRadio_checkedChange event. In this method you can use sender property to figure out the proper radio button's index and take action accordingly.

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you can use

uxRajRadioButton.CheckedChanged += new EventHandler(rb_CheckedChanged);
uxPaulRadioButton.CheckedChanged += new EventHandler(rb_CheckedChanged);
...

uxRajRadioButton.Tag =new KeyValuePair<string,int>("Raj",0);
uxPaulRadioButton.Tag =new KeyValuePair<string,int>("Paul",1);
....

private void rb_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{
    if(!(sender is RadioButton))
         return;
       RadioButton myRadio= sender as RadioButton;
      if (myRadio.Checked == true)
      {
        myRadio.Text = (myRadio.Tag as KeyValuePair<string,int>).Key;
        GuySelected = (myRadio.Tag as KeyValuePair<string,int>).Value;
        uxBetNumericUpDown.Maximum =  Guys[GuySelected].Cash;
      }
}
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What I usually do is I put the index in the tag attribute. This way you can bind this event to every RadioButton

public void uxRadioButton_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    RadioButton myRadio = (RadioButton) sender;
    if (myRadio.Checked)
    {
        GuySelected = (int)myRadio.Tag;
        uxPersonBettingLabel.Text = Guys[GuySelected].Name;
        uxBetNumericUpDown.Maximum = Guys[GuySelected].Cash;
    }
}
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