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I have a question on below class.

Photo class inherits from Form and has an image so when I create the object of Photo class as per its constructor it draws the image because of virtual Drawer method.

There is BorderedPhoto class which inherits from Photo class and also has override method Drawer() which sets border around the photo image.

The program is running fine but my confusion is when i create the object of BorderedPhoto class by reffering Photo class object then why it is called the override Drawer() of Bordered class even though it is not explicitly calling it.

class Photo:Form
{
    Image image;
    public Photo()
    {
        image= new Bitmap(@"C:\Jug_7.jpg");

        this.Text = "My Water Jug";
        this.Paint+= new PaintEventHandler(Drawer);
    }
    public virtual void Drawer(object source, PaintEventArgs e)
    {
        e.Graphics.DrawImage(image, 20, 20);
    }
}
class BorderedPhoto : Photo
{
    Photo photo;
    Color color;
    public BorderedPhoto(Photo p, Color c)
    {
        photo = p;
        color = c;
    }
    public override void Drawer(object source, PaintEventArgs e)
    {
        base.Drawer(source, e);
        e.Graphics.DrawRectangle(new Pen(color, 10), 25, 15, 215, 225);
    }
}
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1  
How are you using the BorderedPhoto class? Please show the usage. – Oded Aug 19 '12 at 19:13
    
yes show the usage and object creation – Rafay Zia Mir Aug 19 '12 at 19:13
5  
"when i create the object of BorderedPhoto class by referring Photo class object" <-- That makes no sense. Please show us your code. – Alastair Maw Aug 19 '12 at 19:14

The program is running fine but my confusion is when i create the object of BorderedPhoto class by refering Photo class object then why it is called the override Drawer() of Bordered class eventhough it is not explicitly calling it.

so I take that to mean something like...

Photo p = new BorderedPhoto();

Well, that's kinda the whole point of polymorphism. If you had to qualify the underlying type when calling a polymorphic method what would be the point? This behavior allows you to work with different implementations through a shared interface.

Furthermore, since you call base.Drawer(source, e); inside of your override, the base class implementation will be called as well.

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