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I'm using a third party library which returns a data reader. I would like a simple way and as generic as possible to convert it into a List of objects.
For example, say I have a class 'Employee' with 2 properties EmployeeId and Name, I would like the data reader (which contains a list of employees) to be converted into List< Employee>.
I guess I have no choice but to iterate though the rows of the data reader and for each of them convert them into an Employee object that I will add to the List. Any better solution? I'm using C# 3.5 and ideally I would like it to be as generic as possible so that it works with any classes (the field names in the DataReader match the property names of the various objects).

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Damn, wish I was near a compiler right now, I would love to write this code! I will have crack at it tomorrow if no-one else blows me away. +1 question. –  Matt Howells Jul 29 '09 at 20:53
    
@MattHowells you can still write it, personally would love to see if its something different. –  nawfal Feb 11 '13 at 17:57
    
possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1464883/… –  nawfal Feb 11 '13 at 18:17
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3 Answers

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Do you really need a list, or would IEnumerable be good enough?

I know you want it to be generic, but a much more common pattern is to have a static Factory method on the target object type that accepts a datarow (or IDataRecord). That would look something like this:

public class Employee
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public static Employee Create(IDataRecord record)
    {
        return new Employee
        {
           Id = record["id"],
           Name = record["name"]
        };
    }
}

.

public IEnumerable<Employee> GetEmployees()
{
    using (var reader = YourLibraryFunction())
    {
       while (reader.Read())
       {
           yield return Employee.Create(reader);
       }
    }
}

Then if you really need a list rather than an IEnumerable you can call .ToList() on the results. I suppose you could also use generics + a delegate to make the code for this pattern more re-usable as well.

Update: I saw this again today and felt like writing the generic code:

public IEnumerable<T> GetData<T>(IDataReader reader, Func<IDataRecord, T> BuildObject)
{
    try
    {
        while (reader.Read())
        {
            yield return BuildObject(reader);
        }
    }
    finally
    {
         reader.Dispose();
    }
}

//call it like this:
var result = GetData(YourLibraryFunction(), Employee.Create);
share|improve this answer
    
I'm definitely of the same sentiment regarding returning an IEnumerable and then perhaps calling ToList. –  Noldorin Jul 29 '09 at 21:06
1  
The updated version is brilliant, tyvm. –  SpaceBison Jul 18 '12 at 15:17
    
It's even easier than I thought back then: in many cases, the generic method can infer the type based on the delegate you pass to it. –  Joel Coehoorn Jul 18 '12 at 15:25
    
Since "yield return" defers the execution, the updated version didn't work for me because by the time it executes, the DataReader is already closed. It's still a good example, though. –  Korey Apr 3 '13 at 18:56
    
@Korey I've used this pattern in a few other places here on Stack Overflow, where the difference is that instead of accepting a datareader as an argument to a function, I would change the code at the location where the datareader is first created to return an IEnumerable instead of datareader or something else. –  Joel Coehoorn Apr 3 '13 at 19:19
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You could build an extension method like:

public static List<T> ReadList<T>(this IDataReader reader, 
                                  Func<IDataRecord, T> generator) {
     var list = new List<T>();
     while (reader.Read())
         list.Add(generator(reader));
     return list;
}

and use it like:

var employeeList = reader.ReadList(x => new Employee {
                                               Name = x.GetString(0),
                                               Age = x.GetInt32(1)
                                        });

Joel's suggestion is a good one. You can choose to return IEnumerable<T>. It's easy to transform the above code:

public static IEnumerable<T> GetEnumerator<T>(this IDataReader reader, 
                                              Func<IDataRecord, T> generator) {
     while (reader.Read())
         yield return generator(reader);
}

If you want to automatically map the columns to properties, the code idea is the same. You can just replace the generator function in the above code with a function that interrogates typeof(T) and sets the properties on the object using reflection by reading the matched column. However, I personally prefer defining a factory method (like the one mentioned in Joel's answer) and passing a delegate of it into this function:

 var list = dataReader.GetEnumerator(Employee.Create).ToList();
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1  
+1 I use extension methods like this all the time. –  Nick Jul 29 '09 at 20:54
    
0 vote down Very nice answer. Linq is so cool. Is it arrogant to feel good about yourself because you can finally read code like this and appreciate it? –  rp. Jul 29 '09 at 20:55
1  
The "0 vote down" doesn't belong! I voted this up. Copy and paste devils got me here. –  rp. Jul 29 '09 at 20:56
    
When I copy and paste this I get 'the type or namespace name 'T' could not be found'. I might be missing something obvious. Ideas? –  Anthony Jul 29 '09 at 21:07
    
Why generator? Question specifies that properties map to columns. –  Matt Howells Jul 29 '09 at 21:08
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Whilst I wouldn't recommend this for production code, but you can do this automatically using reflection and generics:

public static class DataRecordHelper
{
	public static void CreateRecord<T>(IDataRecord record, T myClass)
	{
		PropertyInfo[] propertyInfos = typeof(T).GetProperties();

		for (int i = 0; i < record.FieldCount; i++)
		{
			foreach (PropertyInfo propertyInfo in propertyInfos)
			{
				if (propertyInfo.Name == record.GetName(i))
				{
					propertyInfo.SetValue(myClass, Convert.ChangeType(record.GetValue(i), record.GetFieldType(i)), null);
					break;
				}
			}
		}
	}
}

public class Employee
{
	public int Id { get; set; }
	public string LastName { get; set; }
	public DateTime? BirthDate { get; set; }

	public static IDataReader GetEmployeesReader()
	{
		SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["NorthwindConnectionString"].ConnectionString);

		conn.Open();
		using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("SELECT EmployeeID As Id, LastName, BirthDate FROM Employees"))
		{
			cmd.Connection = conn;
			return cmd.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection);
		}
	}

	public static IEnumerable GetEmployees()
	{
		IDataReader rdr = GetEmployeesReader();
		while (rdr.Read())
		{
			Employee emp = new Employee();
			DataRecordHelper.CreateRecord<Employee>(rdr, emp);

			yield return emp;
		}
	}
}

You can then use CreateRecord<T>() to instantiate any class from the fields in a data reader.

<asp:GridView ID="GvEmps" runat="server" AutoGenerateColumns="true"></asp:GridView>

GvEmps.DataSource = Employee.GetEmployees();
GvEmps.DataBind();
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What wouldn't you recommend it for production? –  Anthony Jul 30 '09 at 7:55
1  
Because it "feels" wrong. Automatically setting properties from a datareader means you have less control over error checking and using reflection is expensive. I don't feel it's robust, though it should work. However, if you are serious about using this kind of technique then you'd be best looking a proper ORM mapping solution, such as LinqToSql, Entity Framwork, nHibernate etc. –  Dan Diplo Jul 30 '09 at 10:03
    
@DanDiplo exactly! this is what most mappers prefer to do, and only we programmers know how brittle it is. we should think about domain objects and meta programming should be the last to resort! –  nawfal Feb 5 '13 at 19:32
    
Use some caching though to improve reflection performance, as shown here the basic idea is to not use reflection inside the loop.. –  nawfal Feb 5 '13 at 19:47
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