Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using the excellent Request library for downloading files in Node for a small command line tool I'm working on. Request works perfectly for pulling in a single file, no problems at all, but it's not working for ZIPs.

For example, I'm trying to download the Twitter Bootstrap archive, which is at the URL:

http://twitter.github.com/bootstrap/assets/bootstrap.zip

The relevant part of the code is:

var fileUrl = "http://twitter.github.com/bootstrap/assets/bootstrap.zip";
var output = "bootstrap.zip";
request(fileUrl, function(err, resp, body) {
  if(err) throw err;
  fs.writeFile(output, body, function(err) {
    console.log("file written!");
  }
}

I've tried setting the encoding to "binary" too but no luck. The actual zip is ~74KB, but when downloaded through the above code it's ~134KB and on double clicking in Finder to extract it, I get the error:

Unable to extract "bootstrap" into "nodetest" (Error 21 - Is a directory)

I get the feeling this is an encoding issue but not sure where to go from here.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, the problem is with encoding. When you wait for the whole transfer to finish body is coerced to a string by default. You can tell request to give you a Buffer instead by setting the encoding option to null:

var fileUrl = "http://twitter.github.com/bootstrap/assets/bootstrap.zip";
var output = "bootstrap.zip";
request({url: fileUrl, encoding: null}, function(err, resp, body) {
  if(err) throw err;
  fs.writeFile(output, body, function(err) {
    console.log("file written!");
  });
});

Another more elegant solution is to use pipe() to point the response to a file writable stream:

request('http://twitter.github.com/bootstrap/assets/bootstrap.zip')
  .pipe(fs.createWriteStream('bootstrap.zip'))
  .on('close', function () {
    console.log('File written!');
  });

A one liner always wins :)

pipe() returns the destination stream (the WriteStream in this case), so you can listen to its close event to get notified when the file was written.

share|improve this answer
    
Great, thank you! That first code blocked worked :) The second way is nicer, but I need a way to run a callback once the file is written, which is why I'd gone for the first option. –  Jack Franklin Aug 19 '12 at 20:38
1  
You can still get a callback when the file is written in the second option by listening to the close event on the WriteStream: request(fileUrl).pipe(fs.createWriteStream(output)).on('close', function () {console.log('File written!');}); –  juandopazo Aug 19 '12 at 20:43
    
That's much nicer! Thank you very much :) –  Jack Franklin Aug 19 '12 at 20:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.