Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to find a user in my database, searching for email and phonenumber. How ever, if I use a List or IEnumerable I'm getting a null refence exception. If I don't use any of those, an "Not supported by SQL ... " is thrown.

My method:

public List<tblMember> getAllMembers()
{
    return db.tblMembers.ToList();
}

private void confirmMembership(string email, int phoneNumber)
{
    //var allMembers = db.tblMembers.AsEnumerable(); throws same exception
    tblMember member = getAllMembers().FirstOrDefault(x => x.email.Equals(email, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) && x.phoneNumber == phoneNumber); //This line throws exception, around email.Equals()
    if (member != null)
    {
        member.isConfirmed = true;
        db.SubmitChanges();
    }
    else
        throw new Exception("Member not found");
}

If I perform the search like this, no exception is thrown:

private void confirmMembership(string email, int phoneNumber)
{
    //var allMembers = db.tblMembers.AsEnumerable(); throws same exception
    tblMember member = getAllMembers().FirstOrDefault(x => x.email == email && x.phoneNumber == phoneNumber);
    if (member != null)
    {
        member.isConfirmed = true;
        db.SubmitChanges();
    }
    else
        throw new Exception("Member not found");
}

How can this be?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In the first case you are calling Equals() on an object that is null.

x.email.Equals(...)

This throws an exception.

In the second case you are comparing two things one of which might be null

x.email == email

Here is the most current based on comments:

private void confirmMembership(string email, int phoneNumber)
{
    tblMember member = tblMembers.FirstOrDefault((x) => {
        if (x.email == null)  return false;
        return SqlMethods.Like(x.email,email) && x.phoneNumber == phoneNumber); 
      }
    if (member != null)
    {
        member.isConfirmed = true;
        db.SubmitChanges();
    }
    else
        throw new Exception("Member not found");
}

Here is another way that won't throw an exception:

private void confirmMembership(string email, int phoneNumber)
{
    //var allMembers = db.tblMembers.AsEnumerable(); throws same exception
    tblMember member = getAllMembers().FirstOrDefault((x) => {
        if (x.email == null)  return false;
        return x.email.Equals(email, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) && x.phoneNumber == phoneNumber); 
      }
    if (member != null)
    {
        member.isConfirmed = true;
        db.SubmitChanges();
    }
    else
        throw new Exception("Member not found");
}
share|improve this answer
    
So if email is null just for one row it will throw exception? –  KLIM8D Aug 19 '12 at 21:07
    
Yep... it only takes one. –  Hogan Aug 19 '12 at 21:10
    
oh well stupid mistake. Thanks for making this clear :) –  KLIM8D Aug 19 '12 at 21:11
    
As noted in my answer, statement lambdas as shown here can't be converted into expression trees. –  Jon Skeet Aug 19 '12 at 21:17
    
@JonSkeet I have only added x.email != null to my code, since the parameter email will never be null. –  KLIM8D Aug 19 '12 at 21:26

I suspect it's because x.email is null for some value of x.

Try:

tblMember member = db.tblMembers
     .FirstOrDefault(x => x.email != null
                     && x.email.Equals(email, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) 
                     && x.phoneNumber == phoneNumber);

EDIT: I've only just noticed that getAllMembers() returns a List<T> so you don't have to worry about the expression tree conversion I was talking about before - but your current code is fetching all the data from the database each time you call this method. Do you really want that? The code I've provided above will do the filtering in the database which is surely what you'd be interested in.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this will fail if the parameter email is passed in as null. In that case you expect it to only match on phonenumber. –  Hogan Aug 19 '12 at 21:08
    
@Hogan: I'd actually expect it to fail for all values in that case. It's not clear whether the OP would want to match the first value where there's a null email address in the table. (I'd expect the parameter to be non-nullable really, which should be validated at the start of the method.) –  Jon Skeet Aug 19 '12 at 21:12
    
Sure, except the example he gives that does not use OrdinalIgnoreCase would perform as I described. I guess I take requirements at face value. –  Hogan Aug 19 '12 at 21:16
    
@Hogan: Actually I'm not sure it would behave like that. It depends on the SQL translation used, but I've seen LINQ scenarios where you've had to explicitly say (x.email == null && email == null) || x.email == email in order to match NULL==NULL. –  Jon Skeet Aug 19 '12 at 21:19
    
@JonSkeet I've without getAllMembers() and performing the filtering in the database. How ever this throws "No supported translation to SQL" exception. Atleast when I try it in LinQPad. "Method 'Boolean Equals(System.String, System.StringComparison)' has no supported translation to SQL." –  KLIM8D Aug 19 '12 at 21:48

This is probably because x.email is null. If it is null, calling a member of it throws an exception.

x.email.Equals(...)   ==> exception

However, you are allowed to compare two values that may be null

x.email == email      ==> OK.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.