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I have some critical branching code inside a loop that's run about 2^26 times. Branch prediction is not optimal because m is random. How would I remove the branching, possibly using bitwise operators?

bool m;
unsigned int a;
const unsigned int k = ...; // k >= 7
if(a == 0)
    a = (m ? (a+1) : (k));
else if(a == k)
    a = (m ?     0 : (a-1));
else
    a = (m ? (a+1) : (a-1));

And here is the relevant assembly generated by gcc -O3:

.cfi_startproc
movl    4(%esp), %edx
movb    8(%esp), %cl
movl    (%edx), %eax
testl   %eax, %eax
jne L15
cmpb    $1, %cl
sbbl    %eax, %eax
andl    $638, %eax
incl    %eax
movl    %eax, (%edx)
ret
L15:
cmpl    $639, %eax
je  L23
testb   %cl, %cl
jne L24
decl    %eax
movl    %eax, (%edx)
ret
L23:
cmpb    $1, %cl
sbbl    %eax, %eax
andl    $638, %eax
movl    %eax, (%edx)
ret
L24:
incl    %eax
movl    %eax, (%edx)
ret
.cfi_endproc
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5  
Before you jump into this, you might want to make sure the compilers you care about aren't actually able to optimize these into conditional moves. –  Mysticial Aug 19 '12 at 21:09
    
Is 0<=a<=k a valid assumption? –  Eric Aug 19 '12 at 21:13
    
@Eric Yes, 0<=a<=k is always true. –  scientiaesthete Aug 19 '12 at 21:16
    
I'm quite surprised that GCC isn't able to turn the inner branches into conditional moves. The ones you have here are a lot simpler than the one in this question where -O3 does the job. –  Mysticial Aug 19 '12 at 21:35
    
Looks like it's basically a = a + (m?1:-1) % k; One branch which a two-element LUT could fix. Or have I got negative modulo wrong...? –  Roddy Aug 19 '12 at 22:10

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The branch-free division-free modulo could have been useful, but testing shows that in practice, it isn't.

const unsigned int k = 639;
void f(bool m, unsigned int &a)
{
    a += m * 2 - 1;
    if (a == -1u)
        a = k;
    else if (a == k + 1)
        a = 0;
}

Testcase:

unsigned a = 0;
f(false, a);
assert(a == 639);
f(false, a);
assert(a == 638);
f(true, a);
assert(a == 639);
f(true, a);
assert(a == 0);
f(true, a);
assert(a == 1);
f(false, a);
assert(a == 0);

Actually timing this, using a test program:

int main()
{
    for (int i = 0; i != 10000; i++)
    {
        unsigned int a = k / 2;
        while (a != 0) f(rand() & 1, a);
    }
}

(Note: there's no srand, so results are deterministic.)

My original answer: 5.3s

The code in the question: 4.8s

Lookup table: 4.5s (static unsigned lookup[2][k+1];)

Lookup table: 4.3s (static unsigned lookup[k+1][2];)

Eric's answer: 4.2s

This version: 4.0s

share|improve this answer
    
Wow! Your version is indeed faster than mine and others, it shaved about 7 nanosecs off of 30 nanosecs / loop. Great improvement! Thanks for all your effort! –  scientiaesthete Aug 19 '12 at 23:02

The fastest I've found is now the table implementation

Timings I got (UPDATED for new measurement code)

HVD's most recent: 9.2s

Table version: 7.4s (with k=693)

Table creation code:

    unsigned int table[2*k];
    table_ptr = table;
    for(int i = 0; i < k; i++){
      unsigned int a = i;
      f(0, a);
      table[i<<1] = a;

      a = i;
      f(1, a);
      table[i<<1 + 1] = a;
    }

Table runtime loop:

void f(bool m, unsigned int &a){
  a = table_ptr[a<<1 | m];
}

With HVD's measurement code, I saw the cost of the rand() dominating the runtime, so that the runtime for a branchless version was about the same range as these solutions. I changed the measurement code to this (UPDATED to keep random branch order, and pre-computing random values to prevent rand(), etc. from trashing the cache)

int main(){
  unsigned int a = k / 2;
  int m[100000];
  for(int i = 0; i < 100000; i++){
    m[i] = rand() & 1;
  }

  for (int i = 0; i != 10000; i++
  {
    for(int j = 0; j != 100000; j++){
      f(m[j], a);  
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! I created a test program and measured, the original version takes ~4.8s, my branch-free version takes ~5.3s so doesn't buy anything (which I had noted in my now deleted answer), yours takes ~4.2s. –  hvd Aug 19 '12 at 22:19
    
Wow. The branch-free division-free modulo is still worse than branching. See my new answer. –  hvd Aug 19 '12 at 22:32
    
I'm not seeing the benefits you get in your latest version. Yes, rand() will take up most of the time, but the time it's taking should be constant, so that doesn't matter, the absolute difference between the different versions is still a useful measurement. I get ~4.3s with that version. –  hvd Aug 19 '12 at 23:21
    
Either way, I just checked and think a table-lookup significantly beats both of our solutions. –  Eric Aug 19 '12 at 23:33
    
I already included that in my tests, and it doesn't (probably because it accesses memory in an unpredictable order). –  hvd Aug 19 '12 at 23:38

I don't think you can remove the branches entirely, but you can reduce the number by branching on m first.

if (m){
    if (a==k) {a = 0;} else {++a;}
}
else {
    if (a==0) {a = k;} else {--a;}
}
share|improve this answer

Adding to Antimony's rewrite:

if (a==k) {a = 0;} else {++a;}

looks like an increase with wraparound. You can write this as

a=(a+1)%k;

which, of course, only makes sense if divisions are actually faster than branches.

Not sure about the other one; too lazy to think about what the (~0)%k will be.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, gcc optimises divisions by constants very well (replacing it by multiplications that rely on integer overflow), but it should be % (k + 1). For the subtraction, just add another k + 1 before subtracting 1 and getting the remainder: a = (a + k) % (k + 1); –  hvd Aug 19 '12 at 21:57
    
I've expanded on your answer in my own. –  hvd Aug 19 '12 at 22:02

This has no branches. Because K is constant, compiler might be able to optimize the modulo depending on it's value. And if K is 'small' then a full lookup table solution would probably be even faster.

bool m;
unsigned int a;
const unsigned int k = ...; // k >= 7
const int inc[2] = {1, k};

a = a + inc[m] % (k+1);
share|improve this answer

If k isn't large enough to cause overflow, you could do something like this:

int a; // Note: not unsigned int
int plusMinus = 2 * m - 1;
a += plusMinus;
if(a == -1) 
    a = k; 
else if (a == k+1) 
    a = 0; 

Still branches, but the branch prediction should be better, since the edge conditions are rarer than m-related conditions.

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