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I am writing a library which may set headers. I want to give a custom error message if headers have already sent, instead of just letting it fail with the "Can't set headers after they are sent" message given by Node.js. So how to check if headers have already sent?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Simple: Connect's Response class provides a public property "headerSent".

res.headerSent is a boolean value that indicates whether the headers have already been sent to the client.

From the source code:

/**
   * Provide a public "header sent" flag
   * until node does.
   *
   * @return {Boolean}
   * @api public
   */

  res.__defineGetter__('headerSent', function(){
    return this._header;
  });

https://github.com/senchalabs/connect/blob/master/lib/patch.js#L22

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Cool! I wonder why this is not documented anywhere. –  powerboy Aug 19 '12 at 22:28
1  
It actually is, but very poorly: senchalabs.org/connect/patch.html –  Niko Aug 19 '12 at 22:32
1  
Note that this is not the same as nodejs.org/docs/latest/api/http.html#http_response_headerssent In express it seems to return the headers sent.. rather than a bool of if the headers have been sent. –  Lee Olayvar Apr 20 '13 at 18:47
    
Everyday I admire how is nodejs easy concept. –  Bruno Garett Nov 29 '13 at 2:44
1  
@powerboy Node currently supports res.headersSent natively, so it's probably a good idea to to start using that property. –  Willem Mulder Jun 6 '14 at 8:47

Node supports the res.headersSent these days, so you could/should use that. It is a read-only boolean indicating whether the headers have already been sent.

if(res.headersSent) { ... }

See http://nodejs.org/api/http.html#http_response_headerssent

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