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Is there a better way to do this:

row_bg_color_group = row_bg_color_group == 1 ? 2 : row_bg_color_group == 2 ? 3 : 1

Ideally something like

row_bg_color_group = (1,2,3).cycle 

and each time through the larger loop the next value would be used.

Please note that this is executed conditionally as part of varying groups size, e.g.

1111
1111
1111
2222
3333
3333
3333
333

not just

111
222
333
111
222
333
111
222
333
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is a cycle() in Rails (docs). So you can do:

row_bg_color_group = cycle(1,2,3)

If you need to have more than one cycle, you can give them names:

row_bg_color_group = cycle(1,2,3, :name => "row_bg_color_group")

and then they won't conflict.

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You could use the modulo operator:

row_bg_color_group = ((row_bg_color_group + 1) % 3) + 1

I don't know your situation, but this looks a little cleaner if you can use groups numbered 0 through 2 instead of 1 through 3.

row_bg_color_group = (row_bg_color_group + 1) % 3
share|improve this answer
    
A useful answer (+1) though I find the cycle method more readable. – Michael Durrant Aug 20 '12 at 12:38
<% outer_loop_control do %>
  <% row_bg_color_group = cycle(1,2,3)
  <% inner_loop_control do %>
    ... # all uses of row_bg_color_group in the inner loop will be the same
  <% end %>
<% end %>
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